Program

WEDNESDAY 11th July

8:00 – 8:45 a.m. Morning meditation by REBECCA CRANE

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Symposium sessions

“Mindfulness for cancer patients” presented by Melanie Schellekens (chair), Maja Johannsen, Else Bisseling, Soumaya Ahmadoun (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Cross-cultural benefits of Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP)” presented by Larissa Duncan (chair), Samuel Wong, Irena Veringa-Skiba, Kishani Townshend (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mechanisms and practices of mindfulness in the workplace” presented by Michael Chaskalson (chair), Chris Tamdjidi, Ute Hulsheger, Esther de Bruin, Hiske van Ravesteijn (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Integrating First-Person and Third-Person Perspectives in Contemplative Science”presented by Amit Bernstein (chair), Judson Brewer, Yuval Hadash, Fynn-Mathis Trautwein (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: A Transdiagnostic Approach” presented by Lynette Monteiro (chair), Bruno Cayoun, Alice Shires, Sarah Francis, Andrea Grabovac (track: philosophical and dharma underpinnings) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Interconnectedness—The key to personal and collective well-being” presented by Winnie Mak (chair), Winnie Mak, Ben Yu, Amanda Fu  (track: philosophical and dharma underpinnings) FULL INFO (PDF)

10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Morning break and poster sessions

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Symposium sessions

““Mindfulness for patients with inflammatory and stress-related somatic disorders” presented by Christina Surawy (chair), Adrián Pérez-Aranda, Rebecca Yeates, Julia Henrich (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness-based parenting interventions for mothers of infants and toddlers” presented by Eva Potharst (chair), Eva Potharst, Myrthe Boekhorst, Moniek Zeegers (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindful management in larger organizations” presented by Felicia Huppert (chair), Felicia Huppert, Arndt Büssing, Ravindra Ganesh, Elisabeth King (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness-Based Interventions: What Works Best, For Whom, and Why?” presented by Jeffrey Greeson (chair), Anne Maj van der Velden, Ivan Nyklíĉek, Jeffrey Greeson, Shian-Ling Keng (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Advanced meditators: experimental and experiential perspectives” presented by Antonino Raffone (chair), Leigh Riby, Qi Wang, James Walsh (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

Meet-the-editor: “How to publish in the journal Mindfulness” by Nirbhay Singh

9:00 a.m.– 12:00 p.m. In-conference workshop

“What makes mindfulness-based supervision mindful? by ALISON EVANS”

12:00 – 12:15 p.m. Transition time

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Parallel keynote 1

“A Benevolent Frankenstein Enters the Therapeutic Mainstream by ZINDEL SEGAL”

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Parallel keynote 2

“Contemplative Neuroscience: Findings, Challenges, and Future Directions” by HELEEN SLAGTER”

1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Lunch break | poster sessions and 1-minute presentations

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. “Creative space”

Meet-the-expert session “Mindfulness: the confluence of ancient wisdom and modern psychological science with WILLEM KUYKEN”

Panel discussion Online embodiment: the possibilities and pitfalls of online mindfulness” with REBECCA CRANE, ZINDEL SEGAL, ARNOLD VAN EMMERIK, WENDY POTS. Moderated by LONE FJORBÄCK

Practice session “Mindful communication” by EDEL MAEX

Music by singer-songwriter CARRIE TREE (UK)

Documentary Deep Look” by VEYSI

2:00 – 4:45 p.m. In-conference workshop

“Mind the gap. Beyond the 8 week course: a reflection and dialogue about possible follow-up formats to support MBI participants in maintaining and deepening their practice” by KATHERINE WEARE and JUDSON BREWER”

3:00 – 3:30 p.m. Afternoon break and poster sessions

3:30 – 4:45 p.m. Symposium sessions

“Implementation of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy” presented by Graham Meadows (chair), Kristen Rawlett, Marleen ter Avest (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Online mindfulness approaches to promote well-being in the community”  presented by Karen Dobkins and Winnie Mak (chairs), Amanda Li, Winnie Mak, Kathleen Walsh, Eduard de Bruin, Karen Dobins (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness and Other Mind-Body Interventions in Health Professions Education” presented by Aviad Haramati (chair), Sian Cotton, Raphaël Bonvin, Andrea Grabovac (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Uncovering the neurocognitive mechanisms of meditation using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)” presented by Dirk Geurts (chair), Gunes Sevinc, Anne Maj van der Velden, Thorsten Barnhofer (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“From contemplative science to contemplative society” presented by Nirbhay Singh (chair), Mareike Smolka, Vincenzo Giorgino & Donald McCown (track: philosophical and dharma underpinnings) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Integrating Self-Compassion and Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Children and Teens”  presented by David Dewulf and Sacha Rombouts (track: various) FULL INFO (PDF)

4:45 – 5:00 p.m. Transition time

5:00 – 6:00 p.m. Plenary keynote

“Ethical Issues in Mindfulness-Based Programs” by RUTH BAER

WEDNESDAY Poster Program

w01 – Van Mulders, Ineke – A Mindfulness-Based Intervention for adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: a pilot study – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

w02 – Greer, Joanna – Reduced behavioural variability in the cognitive profile and wellbeing of expert mediators – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

w03– Hanssen, Imke – Study protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and Treatment as Usual in Bipolar Disorder – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

w04 – Kam Pui, Lee – Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for functional gastrointestinal symptoms among people with general anxiety disorder: a randomized control trial in a Chinese population – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

w05 – Sado, Mitsuhiro – The effectiveness of supplementary mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for non-remitted patients with anxiety disorders: final report of a randomized controlled trial – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

w06 – Isnard Bagnis, Corinne – Enhancing Clinicians’ Well-Being and Patient-Centered Care Through Mindfulness – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

w07 – Papenfuss, Inka – Comparing the effectiveness of different mindfulness interventions for anxiety: The benefit of adding anxiety-specific practice – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

w08 – Vekety, Boglarka – The effects of mindfulness-based interventions on symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder among children: A meta-analysis

w09 – Gardner-Nix, Jacqueline – The Influence of Mindfulness-Based Chronic Pain Management courses in Ontario, Canada, on Medication Consumption, Work Return, and Productivity.

w10 – van der Lee, Marije – Validation of the Dutch Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory in Patients With Medical Illness

w11 – Reka Kassai and Boglarka Vekety – Effects of meditation interventions on cortisol levels. A meta-analysis.

w12 – Martinon, Léa – Compassion-based meditation influences thoughts’ content in both young and older adults.

w13 – Kassai, Reka – Comparing the Efficacy of Mindfulness to Other Interventions to Foster Children’s Executive Function Skills: A Series of Meta-Analyses

w14 – Proeve, Michael – Meditation may not be beneficial for shame: Meditation practice and two types of shame

w15 – Schondel, Maja – Stressfull or Mindful? Sustained Impact of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on Stress, Well-Being and Sick Leave for 1 Year in Patients with Work-related Stress.

w16 – Szabó, Marianna – What is mindful parenting? An empirical test of the dimensions of ‘mindful parenting’ in a cross-cultural context.

w17 – Belisle, Marc – Effects of an 8 week mindfulness based stress reduction program on anxiety and fatigue levels of patients with multiple sclerosis.

w18 – Benda, Jan – Self-compassion and shame-proneness in four different mental disorders: Comparison with healthy controls

w19 – Büssing, Arndt – Influence of spirituality, personality traits and burnout symptoms on Catholic Priests´ Compassion and Altruism

w20 – Hansen, Nanja Holland – Effectiveness of Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) for caregivers

w21 – Jones, Shane – Pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT): Integrating mindfulness into an evidence-based preventive intervention for children and their parents: Optimization of effects

w22 – Lattimore, Paul – Mindfulness based emotional eating awareness training: taking the emotional out of eating.

w23– Leeuwerik, Tamara – What is the relationship of mindfulness and self-compassion with obsessive-compulsive symptoms? Results from a large survey with treatment-seeking adults.

w24 – Lönnberg, Gunilla – Mindfulness Based Childbirth and Parenting: an RCT on effects on stress, depression, breastfeeding, labor and biomarkers

w25 – Masih, Tasmiah – An 8-week, worksite-based relaxation program to reduce stress and attenuate stress-driven eating: A randomized feasibility trial.

w26 – Roux, Benjamin – Implementation of a Mindfulness-Based Intervention among adolescents with behavior disorders: a randomized controlled trial

w27 – Walsh, James – The interactive effect of state and trait mindfulness on reducing implicit racial bias

w28 – Wrzesien, Maja – A meta-analysis of the association between compassion and psychopathology: A transdiagnostic approach.

w29 – Andrés-Rodríguez, Laura – Impact of MBSR on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in fibromyalgia

w30 – Bensliman, Saida – Feasability and perception of a MBSR program on COPD patients

w31 – Birtwell, Kelly – The development of a feasible and acceptable Low-Intensity Mindfulness-Based Intervention

w32– Bismark, MD, MPH, Rashmi S. – Development of a Mindfulness-based Program for Informal Cancer Caregivers in a Clinical Oncology Context

w33 – Clague, Fiona – Effect of Mindfulness Based Interventions on depression and anxiety outcomes in chronic physical disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

w34 – de Bruin, Esther – Mindfulness-based program for children with autism and their parents: Direct and long-term improvements

w35 – Dobkins, Karen – Principles of Clarity—Effects of a novel mindfulness workshop on improving mental well-being

w36 – Feliu-Soler, Albert – Effect of MBSR on perceived cognitive dysfunction (fibrofog) in patients with fibromyalgia

w37 – Jackman, Monica – Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mindfulness-based Social Emotional Learning Curriculum for Preschool Children

w38 – Jermann, Françoise – Mindfulness and Poor Sleep in a Community Sample: Subjective and Objective Sleep Measures and Relationship with Meditation Practice

w39– Lensen, Bernadette – Mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention for elementary school teachers: too soft or a solution?

w40 – Li, Amanda C. M. – Effectiveness of mindfulness taster workshops for adults and primary school students through training non-professional ambassadors: A pilot study

w41 – Mizusaki, Yuki – Influence of Brief Mindfulness Training on Parents’ Anxiety and Depression

w42 – Šumec, Rastislav – Mindfulness and mild cognitive impairment: feasibility, acceptability and proposed MBSR adaptations

w43 – Yaemrattanakul, Weeranan – The Effect of a Mindfulness Movement Therapy Programme on Arm and Hand Function in Patients with Stroke : A Case Study

w44 – Barile, Francesca – The contribution of MBSR Program in the Italian NHS context: supporting resilience and improving coping strategies in outpatients treatment

w45 – Czub, Marcin – Mindfulness, slow diaphragmatic breathing and virtual reality based intervention for chronic pain – a case study.

w46 – Devault, Annie – A study exploring the impact of mindfulness training for doctoral students in psychology starting a clinical internship.

w47 – Kee, Ying Hwa – Development and testing of BellowTrack: A mindful breathing tracking and training mobile application for athletes

w48 – Kosugi, Teppei – A pilot study of mindfulness based cognitive therapy for improving well-being of healthy and ill individuals in Japan: Final report

w49 – Mashhadi, Ali – The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) on Externalizing Problems and Attention Functions in Girls Adolescents with ADHD

w50– Rampes, Hagen – Patient Preference for individual Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

w51 – Sado, Mitsuhiro – Effectiveness of mindfulness based cognitive therapy for improving subjective well-being of healthy individuals: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

w52 – Spinelli, Christina – Stop Suppressing, Stop Smoking? A Protocol Study Comparing Mindfulness, Suppression, and Distraction Strategies for Smoking Cessation

w53 – Wilson, Alistair – Safe: A Mindfulness Based approach in the treatment of Post Traumatic stress disorder in veterans.

w54 – Stiles, Meri – Brief Mindfulness Intervention with College Students for the Reduction of Test Anxiety

w55 > f42

w56 – Ridderinkhof, Anna – Mindfulness-Based Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Parents: Direct and Long-Term Improvements

THURSDAY 12th July

8:00 – 8:45 a.m. Morning meditation by AJAHN AMARO

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Symposium sessions

“Cost-effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Interventions” presented by Janneke Grutters (chair), Lotte Janssen, Félix Compen (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness-Based Programs for Families with Autism Spectrum Disorder” presented by Esther de Bruin (chair), Mette Elmose, Dexing Zhang, Anna Ridderinkhof, Nirbhay Singh (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness and Leadership Research” presented by Wendy Kersemaekers (chair), Silke Rupprecht, Kiki Vreeling, Megan Reitz, Elizabeth King (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Letting in the light: The role of mindfulness in eliciting positive emotion” presented by Brian Ostafin (chair), Nicole Geschwind, Hester Trompetter, Barney Dunn, Dirk Geurts (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness and cognitive processes in major depressive disorder” presented by Willem Kuyken (chair), Frances Shawyer, Christine Kuehner, Pawel Holas, Eva Henje Blom (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Critical and Social Perspectives on Mindfulness”  presented by Kristina Eichel (chair), Rachel Lilley, David Forbes, Nicholas Canby (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Morning break and poster sessions

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Symposium sessions

“Are Mindfulness-Based Self-Help Resources Helpful?” presented by Clara Strauss (chair), Heather Taylor, Jenny Gu, Moitree Banerjee (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Children and Adolescents with ADHD” presented by Nirbhay Singh (chair), Renée Meppelink, Herman Lo, Anna Huguet, Corina Greven (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Common Suffering – Addressing the Hearts, Minds, and Bodies of Health Professionals” presented by Cara Geary (chair), Lucy Sternburgh, Ruth Lerman, Dawn MacDonald (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Exploring the brain and behavioral mechanisms of MBIs for depression and anxiety” presented by Philippe Goldin (chair), Clara Lopez-Sola, Le-anh Dinh-Williams, Norman Farb (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Assessing mindfulness and discernment” presented by Harald Walach (chair), Josef Mattes, Oscar Lecuona, Sarah Chan (track: philosophical and dharma underpinnings) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness, art and performance” presented by Julie Artman (chair), Heather Kempton, Anne-Marie Czajkowski, Jian-Hong Chen (track: various) FULL INFO (PDF)

9:00 a.m.– 12:00 p.m. In-conference workshop

“The Impact of Mindfulness of Feeling Tone (vedana) on Well-Being” by MARTINE BATCHELOR

12:00 – 12:15 p.m. Transition time

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Parallel keynote 1

“The craving mind: why we get hooked, and how mindfulness helps us break free from addictive habits” by JUDSON BREWER

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Parallel keynote 2


“Attending: Mindful Practice at Work” by RONALD EPSTEIN

1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Lunch break | poster session and 1-minute presentations

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. “Creative space”

Meet-the-expert session “The Stress of Success: Opportunities and Challenges in the Mindfulness Universe, 2018” by JON KABAT-ZINN (via video-link), moderated by MARK WILLIAMS and MARTINE BATCHELOR

Panel discussion Does cognitive therapy need mindfulness?” with CLAUDI BOCKTING, JOHANNES MICHALAK, CLARA STRAUSS, SUSAN BÖGELS, moderated by FABIO GIOMMI

Practice session “Compassion” by WILLEM KUYKEN

Dance Programmed by WhyNot. “Still Life Inside” by MARJOLEIN VOGELS and “Morning, mourning” by MARIE KHATIB-SHAHIDI and YOURI PETERS

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. DocumentaryThe Silent Glow – Recovering the Present” by ANJA KRUG-METZINGER

2:00 – 4:45 p.m. In-conference workshop

“Widening the circle of concern: resourcing ourselves to meet the challenge and opportunity of diversity and inclusion” by REBECCA CRANE AND BETHAN ROBERTS

3:00 – 3:30 p.m. Afternoon break and poster sessions

3:30 – 4:45 p.m. Symposium sessions

“Tapering of antidepressant medication – trials and tribulations”  presented by Zindel Segal (chair), Anders Sørensen, Alice Tickell, Carolien Wentink, Claudi Bockting (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Using mindfulness-based interventions in addictive behaviours”  presented by Judson Brewer (chair), Oscar Lecuona, Kimberly Carrière, Nadine Richter, Konstantinos Zervos (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness in the Education System” presented by Silke Rupprecht (chair), Marie Ottilie Frenkel, Tammy Gilligan, Nils Altner, Jesus Montero-Marin (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Social psychological insights into mindfulness”  presented by Tim Hopthrow (chair), Geoffrey Haddock, Kim Lien van der Schans, Colin Foad, Lynsey Mahmood (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Philosophical and anthropological perspectives on the mindfulness movement”  presented by Graeme Nixon (chair), Jane Kellock Arnold, Ngar-Sze Lau, Josef Mattes (track: philosophical and dharma underpinnings) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Using sound to heal: from metaphysics to application”  presented by Murali Nair (chair), Nicholas Schwalbe, Gabrielle Bodzin, Nils de Mol van Otterloo (track: various) FULL INFO (PDF)

4:45 – 5:00 p.m. Transition time

5:00 – 6:00 p.m. Plenary keynote

“Secular Dharma: From Truths to Tasks by STEPHEN BATCHELOR”

THURSDAY Poster Program

t01 – Donald, James – Mindfulness and the quality of human motivation: A meta-analysis using self-determination theory – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

t02 – Gouveia, Maria – The protective effect of adolescent’s dispositional mindfulness on the association between weight and shame – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

t03 – Moreira, Helena – Mindful parenting and adolescents’ well-being in early and middle/late adolescence: The mediating role of adolescents’ attachment, self-compassion and mindfulness – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

t04 – Dunning, Darren – The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Interventions on Cognition and Mental Health in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis of RCTs – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

t05 – Masters-Waage, Theo – Integrating Mindfulness in Education: A working model for developing an effective mindfulness training program for high-school students – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

t06– Parker, Jenna – A study protocol for the randomised controlled trial: My Resilience in Adolescence (MYRIAD) Project – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

t07 – Keng, Shian-Ling – Does Equanimity Predict Slower Aging? Association among Trait Mindfulness, Leukocyte Telomere Length, and Psychological Symptoms in Han Chinese. – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE, withdrawn.

t08– Vekety, Boglarka – Best Mindfulness Meditation Practices for Children: A Content Analysis of Evidence-Based Interventions

t09 – Van Seggelen-Damen, Inge – Being mindful to become resilient: A prevention focus

t10 – Noone, Steve – Introducing mindfulness to stressed family carers: Using collaborative methodology to identify chosen indicators of positive change

t11 – Carvalho, Joana – Effects of a mindfulness-based intervention for teachers: A study on teacher and classroom outcomes

t12 – Dobkins, Karen – Is the content of the “inner human experience” related to mindfulness and well-being – An experience sampling study

t13 – Rupprecht, Silke – Mind the teachers! The impact of mindfulness training on self-regulation and classroom performance in a sample of German teachers.

t14 – Artman, Julie – If the Buddha Walked Mindfully On Stage: Mindfulness and Buddha-Nature Across Disciplines

t15 – Bagaric, Branka – Mental and physical health of Croatian police officers before and after MBCT

t16 – Juul, Lise – Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in a Self-Selecting and Self-Paying Community Setting

t17 – Lin, Wei-Fang – Being mindfulness buffer the negative effects of active-destructive response.

t18 – Markanovic, Dragana – The efficacy of an adapted MBCT program on stress reduction in prison personnel

t19 – Martinon, Léa – A short dose comparison of pure mindfulness and compassion-focussed mindfulness: implications for reflection and rumination

t20 – Solms, Lara – Mindfulness Meditation: A Remedy for Creativity Under Avoidance Motivation?

t21 – Spinelli, Christina – Mindfulness and Ambiguity Tolerance: Fostering resilience in an ambiguous world

t22 – Strevens, Mary – Higher Education Professionals’ Experiences of Mindful Learning as a Contemplative Pedagogy: A Systematic Literature Review.

t23 – Walach, Harald – Mindfulness in Schools – Trials and Tribulations: Results of Two Pilot Studies

t24 – Adarves-Yorno, Inmaculada – Rehabilitating Kenyan Inmates through Mindfulness PLUS Training

t25 – Cotton, Sian – Facets of Mindfulness and their Relationship to Burnout, Empathy, and Perspective-Taking in US Medical Students

t26 – Dresler, Emma – Mindfulness in schools: A conceptual review of well-being

t27 – Ebner, Barbara – Mindfulness-based stabilization of primary school children – a longitudinal study on the effects of mindfulness training on classroom climate

t28 – Gibbs, Joanne – A multi-faceted mindfulness program for healthcare workers in a large metropolitan health service is associated with positive personal change.

t29 – Montero-Marin, Jesus – Preliminary Efficacy of 8- and 2-Session Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Primary Care providers: A Randomized Controlled Study

t30 – Santisteban Negroe, Juan Manuel – Factor Structure and Internal Consistency of a Mindfulness Questionnaire for Mexican Young Adults

t31 – Schroeder, Paul – Are those who are more mindful also more resilient? Dispositional resilience and mindfulness among U.S. Military active duty and veterans

t32 – Bu, Christopher – Exploring Mindful Practice: Pilot Mindfulness Course To Reduce Stress And Burnout In 1 (st) and 2 (nd)  Year UK Foundation Junior Doctors

t33 – Arthurson, Kathy – Older Persons and Mindfulness Practice: An Alternative Perspective to Common Paradigms about Aging and Decline in Everyday Life

t34 – Bichler, Teresa – “Mindfulness-based training for primary school teacher – a longitudinal study on the effects of mindfulness training on stress and burnout parameters”

t35 – Blondé, Philippe – The links between attentional networks, episodic memory encoding and trait mindfulness in the context of aging.

t36 – Bruce, Claire – Examining possible relationships between perceptions of tennis coach transformational leadership behaviour with athlete basic need satisfaction and mindfulness.

t37 – Gilligan, Tammy; Kielty, Michele; Staton, Renee – Multi-Level Integration of Mindfulness Teaching, Research, and Service in Training School-based Counselors and Educators

t38 – Gray, Lori – The Effectiveness of Mindfulness Meditation Module for College Freshman Who Have Aged Out of Foster Care

t39 – Ibinarriaga-Soltero, Barbara – Teaching Contemplative Practices in Mexico: Towards a Historical Account

t40 – Olvera Ruvalcaba, Aida Joselyn – Improving self-compassion and relationship with food: Mindful-eating training in Mexican undergraduate students

t41 – Schroeder, Paul – Is mindfulness related to how long one spends with an organization? A cross-sectional comparison of dispositional mindfulness and time-in-service

t42 – Turato, Massimo – Work-related stress and health promotion: introducing the MBSR program among Italian NHS hospital personnel

t43– White, Lacie – (Dis)entangling mindfulness in palliative care nursing: “Mindfulness gets thrown around all the time, but what does it mean in practice?”

t44 – Tsai, Chun-Yen – Mindful protection in information society: Relationships among mindfulness, self-regulation, and problematic behavior

t45 – Decuypere, Anouk – Leader attentive communication – towards the development of a new questionnaire

t46– Finci, Paige – Listening: The effects of a story-based mindfulness program on comprehension and autonomous practice of children aged 6 to 7 years.

t47– Spinelli, Christina – Can Trait Mindfulness and Self-Compassion Protect Undergraduate Students from Drinking to Cope and Alcohol-Related Problems?

t48 – Loureiro, Raquel – Measuring the impact of a Mindfulness intervention in Upper School students

t49 – Seema, Riin – Teacher´s mindfulness – meditation practice, personality trait, and perceived influence on state, in the context of the Estonian religious freedom

t50 – Wong, Venus P. Y. – Can wellness be prescribed? The qualitative feedback from medical students who attended the mindful practice training offered under the core curriculum

t51 – Radecka, Patrycja – Mindfulness as a self-assessment tool

t52 – Uzun, Bilge – Assessing Mindfulness in School-Aged Children: Development and Validation of BAU Mindfulness Scale For Children (BAU-MSC)

t53 – Uzun, Bilge – Mindfulness Based Interventions for Elementary School Students in Turkey

t54 – Fourianalistyawati, Endang – The Role of Mindfulness and Relationship Quality on Pregnant Mothers’ Quality of Life

t55 – Bigdeli, Imanollah – The role of mindfulness and emotion regulation in prediction of post-traumatic stress Disorder in firefighters

t56 – Eugene, Clementia – Integrating mindfulness in teaching the course ‘Inter and intra personal development’

t57 – Kassai, Reka – The effects of a short mindfulness intervention on executive functions and salivary cortisol levels upon school entry

t58 – Mahmood, Lynsey – Testing the use of mindfulness to reduce stereotype threat and improve girls math performance and self-efficacy

FRIDAY 13th July

8:00 – 8:45 a.m. Morning meditation by HELEN MA

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Symposium sessions

“Online mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for cancer patients” presented by Marije van der Lee (chair), Linda Cillessen, Marije van der Lee, Félix Compen, Julia Wahl (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness for chronic somatic conditions” presented by Barbara Pickut (chair), Gillian Mathews, Eric Loucks, Barbara Pickut, Lotte Berk (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness in the workplace: scientific evidence and open questions” presented by Wibo Koole (chair), Silke Rupprecht, Esther de Bruin, Wendy Kersemaekers, Linda Kantor (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Mindfulness in the justice system” presented by Machteld Hoeve (chair), Nelleke van Zessen, Nienke Bouw, Christina Spinelli (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Trajectories and dynamic changes during and after mindfulness interventions” presented by Ruth Baer (chair), Evelien Snippe, Ivan Nyklíĉek, Christopher May, Nina Vollbehr (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Breaking the cycle of desire: The role of mindfulness in craving for alcohol, drugs, and food” presented by Brian Ostafin (chair), Brian Ostafin, Esther Aarts, Mike Keesman (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Morning break and poster sessions

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Symposium sessions

“Self-compassion interventions: qualitative and quantitative impact” presented by Maya Schroevers (chair), Maya Schroevers, Terri Messman-Moore, Marion Spijkerman, Rhoda Schuling (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Adults with ADHD and parents of children with ADHD” presented by Philip Asherson (chair), Lotte Janssen, Dirk Geurts, Herman Lo (track: clinical applications) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Diversity in the mindfulness community?” presented by Nava Levit-Binnun (chair), Inge de Leeuw, Amanda Fu, Tiara Cash (track: mindfulness in society) FULL INFO (PDF)

“Experimental studies investigating the possible working mechanisms of mindfulness” presented by Johannes Michalak (chair), Nikolett Eisenbeck, Zaffie Cox, Inka Papenfuss, Katleen Van der Gucht (track: working mechanisms) FULL INFO (PDF)

“If you treasure it, measure it: assessing mindfulness, compassion, and equanimity” presented by Ruth Baer (chair), Clara Strauss, Philippe Goldin, Amit Bernstein (track: philosophical and dharma underpinnings) FULL INFO (PDF)

Special Interest Meeting “Establishing a ‘Community on Contemplative Education’ in Europe” by KATHERINE WEARE and SANDER TIDEMAN

9:00 a.m.– 12:00 p.m. In-conference workshop

“Meditation Safety: Research and Practice” by WILLOUGHBY BRITTON AND JARED LINDAHL

12:00 – 12:15 p.m. Transition time

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Parallel keynote 1

“From Cradle to Grave: Taking a life course approach to mindfulness interventions” by SAMUEL WONG

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Parallel keynote 2

“The Impact of Mindfulness of Feeling Tone (vedana) on Well-Being” by MARTINE BATCHELOR

1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Lunch break | poster sessions and 1-minute presentations

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. “Creative space”

Meet-the-expert session “Unshakable Well-Being – is the Buddhist concept of enlightenment a meaningful possibility in the current age?” by AJAHN AMARO

Panel discussion Can meditation do more harm than good?” with WILLOUGHBY BRITTON, JARED LINDAHL, RUTH BAER, ROGIER HOENDERS, moderated by FABIO GIOMMI.

Practice session “Mindful Movement” by GEORGE LANGENBERG

Art Mindful Drawing” Workshop by CORIEN BÖGELS

DocumentaryPrison Pioneers” by Ulrike Helmer, presented by LAETITIA SCHOOFS

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. In-conference clinical lesson “Mindfulness and Cancer: A Clinical Lesson” by TRISH BARTLEY

3:00 – 3:30 p.m. Afternoon break and poster sessions

3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Plenary keynote

“Mindfulness: keeping our balance”
by MARK WILLIAMS

4:30 – 4:45 p.m. Closing talk by SUSAN BÖGELS & ANNE SPECKENS

FRIDAY Poster Program

f01 – Matko, Karin – The Top 10: Prevalence and Popularity of Basic Meditation Practices in Different Spiritual Traditions – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

f02 – Juneau, Catherine – Defining and measuring Equanimity – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

f03 – Kim, Soobin – Function of Subfactors of Self-Compassion on Psychological Outcomes in Korean: A meta-analysis – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

f04 – Krimsky, Marissa – The Allocation of Attentional Resources: Exploring Fluctuations in Mind Wandering with Attentional Performance and Affective Variables – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

f05 – Levit-Binnun, Nava – Cultivating “Right Effort: increased regulatory choice flexibility following a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) workshop – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

f06 – Logie, Kyle – A Novel Breath-Focused Task: Dissociating Awareness and Physiological Change – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

f07 – Wong, Venus P. Y. – Motivational differences between the mindfulness practice in the tradition of Buddhist Psychology and scientifically proven mindfulness-based interventions – POSTER AWARD NOMINEE

f08 – Canby, Nicholas – The effects of mindfulness practice on empathy, listening skills, affect, and anxiety in an experimental social interaction

f09 – Chang, Jen-Ho – Mindfulness and optimal desire regulation

f10 – Cox, Zaffie – The effect of focused-attention meditation dosage on time perception.

f11 – Eisenbeck, Nikolett – Personal meaning increases the efficacy of mindfulness

f12 – Ewert, Christina – The relationship between mindful self-compassion and coping: A meta-analysis

f13 – Fu, Amanda – Effects of self-compassion on general and social life satisfaction among lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals

f14 – Hadash, Yuval – Experiential Self-Referential and Selfless Processing in Mindfulness and Mental Health: Conceptual Model and Implicit Measurement Methodology

f15– Hyvärinen, Aapo – Decoding mindfulness vs. wandering thoughts from magnetoencephalography using machine learning

f16 – Leung, Donald – The Mediating Roles of Cognitive Biases in the Associations between Trait Mindfulness and Affective Symptoms

f17 – Moreira, Helena – Self-Critical Rumination and Parenting Stress: The Mediating Role of Mindful Parenting

f18 – Sharpe, Paul – Replicating the Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on The Attention Network Test

f19 – Bagaric, Branka – Can metacognitive beliefs and mindfulness differentiate between levels of cyberchondria?

f20 – Belton, Sara – Exploring the contexts of mindfulness-based interventions experienced by health care workers in North American health care settings

f21 – Gouveia, Maria – The role of mindful parenting and children/adolescents’ weight on mothers’ feeding practices, beliefs and attitudes

f22 – Montero-Marin, Jesus – Impact of a blended web-based mindfulness programme for General Practitioners: a pilot Study

f23 – Pickard, Judy – The role of mindfulness and emotional regulation in predicting maternal depression. A longitudinal birth cohort study

f24 – Schneider, Jekaterina – The role of mindfulness in physical activity: A systematic review

f25 – Sperduti, Marco – The effects of dispositional and state mindfulness on prospective memory: a virtual reality study

f26 – Wang, Qi – A Scale to Measure the Lived Experience of Enlightenment: A Preliminary Research from the Perspectives of Religion and Psychology.

f27 – Grabovac, Andrea – Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Canadian Psychiatry Postgraduate Training Programs: Attitudes and Training Availability

f28 – Monteiro, Lynette – Ethics and Mindfulness: Issues in Growing, Training & Valuing the Teaching of Mindfulness​

f29 – Araujo, Geissy – A Brief Mindfulness-Based Intervention Enhances Psychological Measures of Well-being

f30 – di Fronso, Selenia – Mindfulness-Based Intervention Strategies: A multimodal assessment of Mindful-Yoga, Sitting Meditation and Body Scan effects

f31 – Gomutbutra, Patama – “A Study Protocol of Phase I Randomized Crossover Trial Study Effect of Flow Practice to Mi tochondrial Function, N euro-autonomic Biomarker, and D NA Telomerase Activity. The Flow-MiND study

f32 – Jankowski, Tomasz – MINDFULNESS AND MEMORY RETRIEVAL PROCESSES. AN ERP STUDY

f33 – Kassai, Reka – Preschoolers can meditate. Electrodermal activity during mindfulness meditation in a randomized controlled trial.

f34 – Musten, Frank – Ethical challenges in organizations: Complexities of developing mindfulness programs for leaders and executive trainers

f35 – Peijsel, Chatwiboon – Trait Mindfulness and Cognitive Emotion Regulation: An Investigation as to the Relationship with Emotional States in the US and Thailand

f36 – Büchner, Anabel – Don’t be so hard on yourself! The influence of mindful self-compassion on stress processing and well-being.

f37 – Messman-Moore, Terri – A Preliminary Quasi-Experimental Study of the Impact of Mindfulness Training on Emotion Dysregulation and Distress among Undergraduates in the U.S.

f38 – Takahashi, Toru – Review on the relationship between mindfulness and feedback-related negativity in terms of the predictive coding model of mindfulness

f39 – Raffone, Antonino – Electroencephalographic correlates of focused attention, open monitoring and loving kindness meditation in Theravada Buddhist monks

f40 – Ziemer, Kelly – Recommendations for Utilizing an Inclusive Lens when Implementing Mindfulness-Based Interventions Moderating Positive Emotions with Diverse Populations

f41 – Uzun, Bilge – The Implications of Mindfulness Training on EFL Students’ Second Language Speaking Anxiety and Willingness to Communicate

f42 – Lee, Inyeong – Study of negative parenting of middle aged Korean mothers

Pre-conference workshops - Tuesday 10 July 2018

Show preliminary program

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. – Pre-conference workshops
RONALD EPSTEINCHRIS CULLENNANCY BARDACKE AND LARISSA DUNCANMICHAEL CHASKALSON AND WIBO KOOLEFRITS KOSTER AND ERIK VAN DEN BRINKTRISH BARTLEY AND GEMMA GRIFFITHBART VAN MELIK
Ronald Epstein, MD, PhD, is Professor of Family Medicine, Psychiatry and Oncology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry (USA), where he also directs the Center for Communication and Disparities Research. He co-directs Mindful Practice programs and the Deans Teaching Fellowship program. Through his work and development of innovative educational programs, he has been passionately devoted to promoting physician self-awareness, mindfulness and effective communication in clinical practice. His latest book “Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity” (2017) is a crucial, timely book that shows us how we can restore humanity to medicine, guides us toward a better overall quality of care, and reminds us of what matters most.
“Being mindful at work: key skills to enhance quality of care, quality of caring and resilience in work settings”
This workshop will focus on skills of self-awareness, attending to suffering, deep listening to others and use of narratives to transform work settings into opportunities for mindful practice and mindful action. The workshop will be divided into three segments. The first will be “Noticing: what we attend to” and will examine what we choose to attend to and how. The second segment will be “Responding to suffering” and will encompass suffering of clients, patients, colleagues and ourselves. The third segment will be “Resilience and flourishing” and will focus on recognizing and enhancing strengths to truly flourish in the workplace.
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Chris Cullen has practised and studied Buddhist psychology since 1994 and has been teaching Insight Meditation retreats since 2008. He is a MBCT Teacher and Trainer at the Oxford Mindfulness Centre, University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry (UK) and has a psychotherapy practice in Oxford. He also teaches mindfulness courses for MPs in Parliament.
“The experience and nature of liberating insight in early Buddhist teachings and contemporary mindfulness-based approaches”
The Buddha’s teachings assert that the alleviation of and liberation from dissatisfaction, distress and suffering most effectively come through transformations of understanding: insights into the ways in which the worlds of self and of suffering are constructed and can be deconstructed moment by moment. This understanding also pervades contemporary mindfulness-based applications such as MBSR and MBCT, and is integral to effective teaching of these programmes.
During this workshop, through presentation, practice and discussion, we will explore the nature and domains of insight within early Buddhist teachings and contemporary mindfulness-based approaches, and how these understandings can be cultivated in practice and progressively embodied.
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Nancy Bardacke, midwife, mindfulness teacher, is the founding director of the Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting programme which she currently leads at the Osher Centre for Integrative Medicine at the University of California San Francisco Medical Centre (USA). She is also an Assistant Clinical Professor in the UCSF School of Nursing. She offers mindfulness workshops for expectant parents and healthcare providers, as well as professional trainings for MBCP instructors nationally and internationally. In her latest book “Mindful Birthing: Training the Mind, Body, and Heart for Childbirth and Beyond” (2016), she offers practices that will help to find calm and ease during this life-changing time, providing lifelong skills for healthy living and wise parenting.
Larissa Duncan, PhD, is Elizabeth C. Davies Chair in Child & Family Well-Being and Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at the School of Human Ecology and the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin–Madison (USA). She has been working closely with Nancy Bardacke on the Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting programme and is internationally recognized for her development of a framework to promote and assess mindful parenting as well as her work to bring mindfulness and compassion training to pregnant women and children/adolescents in diverse community contexts.
“Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP):
A Possibility for Interrupting Intergenerational Patterns of Suffering?”
Becoming a parent is perhaps the most profound change in the adult life cycle. Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP) is designed as a childbirth education program grounded in teaching expectant parents mindfulness skills for addressing the stresses of pregnancy, the pain and fear that can be a normal part of the unpredictable birthing journey that brings new life into this world — and to have these skills in place for attuned parenting from the moments of birth. In learning mindfulness skills during pregnancy, there may be a way to increase the potential for a healthier gestation, a more positive childbirth and early postpartum experience as well as provide new parents with inner skills for parenting the next generation with greater awareness, kindness, connectedness, and care.
In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to:
• Learn about the history and developing global reach of MBCP
• Understand the applicability of MBCP for diverse populations, including the urban poor, rural populations and immigrant communities
• Experience first-hand several of the mind/body pain practices as they are taught in the MBCP classroom
• Hear about the most recent research supporting the MBCP program.
Download flyer.
Michael Chaskalson is a pioneer in the application of mindfulness in workplace and leadership contexts. Based on his 40 years of personal practice of mindfulness and related disciplines, Michael lectures and writes about his insights and research to a variety of audiences worldwide. He works as a coach, consultant, and teacher to help organizations as well as individuals to learn and benefit from mindfulness in the context of work and leadership. He is founder and CEO of Mindfulness Works and a Professor of Practice at Ashridge Business School (UK). His book “Mind Time: How ten mindful minutes can enhance your work, health and happiness” is due in 2018.
Wibo Koole is a management consultant and leadership expert for innovation in complex systems. He is one of the founders and directors of the Centre for Mindfulness in Amsterdam, where he teaches mindfulness programs for leaders and corporations. His work focuses on strategy and innovation, change management and leadership development in a wide range of organizations, both corporate and social. He wrote two bestselling books on mindfulness in organisations, including “Mindful Leadership; Effective tools to help your focus and succeed” (2014).
“Teaching Mindfulness in organizations: the developing practice”
The focus of attention will be on the development of the practice of mindfulness in organizations and in leadership, with an emphasis on what we scientifically know (or don’t yet know). The two chairs, who both have extensive experience in this field, will share their insight into the issues that arise when teaching mindfulness in organizations.
This workshop will address a range of questions with regard to the key elements of teaching mindfulness in organizations (both in the workplace and in leadership), whether different contexts call for different approaches to mindfulness, and whether it’s possible to create a mindful and compassionate organizational culture, and we will examine some of the ethical issues that arise.
Concerning the effectiveness of workplace and leadership mindfulness programs, we will consider the available evidence (what interventions appear best and for whom) and hope to address the question of how workplace mindfulness interventions relate to the integrity of mindfulness-based interventions more widely. Finally, we plan to touch on the question of good practice in teaching mindfulness in organizations. How does teaching mindfulness in organizations compare to teaching mindfulness in health care and medicine? And what competencies do trainers need for teaching mindfulness in an organizational context?
The workshop program will consist of presentations, interactive dialogues and a few experiential exercises for training mindfulness in the workplace and leadership, led by the two chairs.
Learning objectives:
• Participants in the workshop will get a clearer sense of the range of mindfulness interventions currently being offered for leaders and in the workplace more generally.
• They will get an understanding of the range of evidence available for the effectiveness or otherwise of some of these.
• They will understand more clearly what is emerging in the developing field of the assessment of workplace mindfulness teacher competency and better understand some of the issues involved as the field develops.
Download flyer.
Frits Koster is a vipassana meditation teacher and qualified mindfulness teacher. He has also trained and worked as a psychiatric nurse. He has taught mindfulness in mental health settings, including clinics and hospitals for many years. He has been practicing Theravada Buddhism for almost 40 years and was a Buddhist monk for six years in the 1980s, studying Buddhist psychology at various monasteries in Southeast Asia. He has been leading vipassana retreats and courses since then. Together with Erik van den Brink, he developed the Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living programme. He has also written several books on Buddhist meditation, mindfulness and compassion, and the book “A Practical Guide to Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living: Living with Heart” that he co-authors with Erik van den Brink is due out in February 2018.
Erik van den Brink, MD, is a psychiatrist, psychotherapist and qualified mindfulness teacher. He was co-founder of the Center for Integrative Psychiatry in Groningen (NL). He currently works in private practice and psycho-oncology. He has been practising meditation (vipassana and Zen) for over 20 years, trained in several mindfulness-based interventions including Compassion Focussed Therapy. He co-founded the Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living programme together with Frits Koster, and their new book on the programme is due in February 2018. He has specialised in methods that enhance people’s self-healing capacity, and has lectured and written about these approaches.
“Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living – Living with Heart”
‘Compassion’ is a sensitivity towards our own and others’ pain and suffering, as well as a commitment to try to alleviate and prevent it. This requires empathy, courage and wisdom. Like mindfulness, it is a universal human capacity, which is for many reasons often not fully developed but can be cultivated by training.
Many people with chronic or recurring mental or physical health problems suffer from low self-esteem, shame and self-criticism. Compassion training nourishes an inner helper rather than an inner critic and offers exercises to experience more warmth, safeness, acceptance, understanding and connectedness, with oneself and others.
Frits Koster and Erik van den Brink have developed a follow-up programme for participants of standard mindfulness courses (MBSR, MBCT, Breathworks or equivalent) who find it difficult to carry on the practice alone and who tend to be overly harsh to themselves. In the eight session Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living or MBCL training explicit attention is paid to developing a kind and compassionate attitude towards oneself and others whilst being mindful. MBCL integrates elements from Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT), evolutionary and positive psychology and neuroscientific findings with mindfulness-based methods. It is inspired by the work of Paul Gilbert, Kristin Neff, Christopher Germer, Tara Brach, Barbara Fredrickson and Rick Hanson among others.
The programme was developed in the mental health care setting but is widely applicable to other fields, such as coaching, burn-out prevention, education, pastoral care, management and the workplace. Many healthcare professionals and mindfulness teachers are attracted to MBCL as it helps them deepening their practice and embodying kindness and compassion while caring for their clients and themselves in a balanced way.
Learning objectives:
• Participants receive a concise overview of relevant background theory of the MBCL-programme.
• Participants will experience some of the key exercises of the MBCL-programme through personal practice and interactive inquiry.
• At the end of the workshop participants will have a basic understanding of what MBCL has to offer clients and professionals, including themselves, and how it deepens the practice started with MBSR/MBCT.
Download flyer.
Trish Bartley is extensively involved in training mindfulness-based teachers to understand and support the potential of the group to benefit their participants. She has taught mindfulness to people with cancer since 2001, and developed the MBCT protocol for this group, supported by John Teasdale and Mark Williams. She teaches MBCT in groups and 1to1 to those with advanced illness. Trish is a member of the core training team at CMRP. She offers retreats and mindfulness-based training workshops in the UK, Europe and South Africa. Her latests book “Mindfulness: A Kindly Approach to Being with Cancer” (2016) offers people with cancer a means to bring mindfulness and kindliness into their lives, to help them cope with the challenge of a life-threatening illness.
Gemma Griffith, PhD, is a psychologist and the Director of CMRP Postgraduate Programmes. She has published numerous journal articles using both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies in the field of learning disabilities and autism. She trained to be a mindfulness teacher with the CMRP and gained the Certificate of Competence in Teaching Mindfulness Based Courses in 2015. She teaches MBSR courses to the general public population. Her current research interests include the role of groups in MBPs, qualitative research, mindful parenting, and the adaptation of mindfulness-based interventions for people with learning disabilities who have difficulties with anger management, and mindfulness interventions for care staff.
“Teaching Mindfulness-Based Groups – the ‘Inside Out’ way”
This workshop will offer participants the opportunity to explore the rich opportunities offered by the group within mindfulness-based programmes (MBPs). The workshop will be framed by a new teaching approach, that of the ‘Inside Out’ model.
Many of us come to mindfulness-based teaching from a background in one to one work. When this is translated into a MBP, the significant potential of the group to normalise shared patterns of vulnerability can be lost. In this workshop, we offer ways of working with the ‘group’ as an entity in its own right.
The workshop will be delivered through a rich and varied process that will include:
  • A conference debut of the ‘Inside Out model’ (at time of writing – this is in preparation for journal publication)
  • Experiential learning that will develop and enhance skills that MBP teachers can bring to their work of teaching mindfulness-based groups
  • An overview of current literature relating to MBP group process.
This workshop will offer the following learning objectives to mindfulness-based teachers working in group formats:
  • Why the ‘inside out’ embodiment of the teacher is central to the practice of the mindfulness-based teacher
  • Learning and understanding in relation to what groups need to form and develop
  • An appreciation of some of the vulnerabilities that participants bring into the group and what these are influenced by
  • How as teachers we can safely and kindly hold the learning container of the group

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Bart van Melik is a meditation teacher since 2009 and is currently based in New York City. He teaches Vipassana and Insight Dialogue courses and retreats at the New York Insight Meditation Centre, Metta Foundation, Lineage Project and Nalanda Institutes. He particularly teaches youth in juvenile detention centers, homeless shelters and New York City public schools. He holds a MA in Psychology of Culture and Religion and graduated from the IMS/Spirit Rock Teacher Training.
“Insight Dialogue: Meditation in dialogue”
Background: Interpersonal relations can both be a source of great joy and a source of great suffering. Hence, relations provide us with very rich material to inspire practice and personal growth. Insight Dialogue has been specifically developed to practice Mindfulness while being in dialogue with others. It is a formal buddhist meditation practice of speaking and listening.

Content of the workshop:
This full-day pre-conference workshop is an invitation to deepen understanding and compassion in relation to others. When we settle down and start to let go of our habitual patterns of interacting with others, understanding and good communication can develop in a natural way. Supported by practical meditation instructions, we will use a number of themes to explore mindful awareness in dialogue, and reflect on the Buddha’s lessons about how stress arises and ceases, and how our lives are constantly subject to change.
Download flyer.
10:30 – 11:00 a.m. – Morning break
12:30 – 1:30 p.m. – Lunch break
3:00 – 3:30 p.m. – Afternoon break
5:00 – 7:00 p.m. – Opening reception
Registration, drinks and a word of welcome from the scientific chairs, Prof. Susan Bögels and Prof. Anne Speckens
SUSAN BöGELS AND ANNE SPECKENS
Susan Bögels, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and psychotherapist and is Professor in Developmental Psychopathology at the University of Amsterdam (NL), director of the Academic treatment Centre for Parent and Child, UvA minds and director of the Academic training Centre, UvA minds You. Her main research area is the intergenerational transmission of anxiety from parents to children. She also studies the prevention and treatment of child anxiety disorders through child- and family-focused interventions. Applying mindfulness as an intervention in the family context is another area of interest. She has written several books on psychotherapeutic approaches for children and adolescents, including “Mindful parenting: a guide for mental health practitioners” (2015).
Anne Speckens, MD, PhD, is a psychiatrist and cognitive behavioural therapist. She is the founder and clinical director of the Radboudumc Centre for Mindfulness at the Radboud University in Nijmegen (NL) and an internationally acknowledged expert on MBIs for both psychiatric and somatic conditions. She has been Principal Investigator of several large-scale national randomized clinical trials on MBCT for depression, adults with ADHD, face-to-face and online MBIs for cancer patients and other somatic conditions, and MBIs for medical professionals. Other research interest include the cognitive and neurobiological processes underlying psychiatric disorders.

Post-conference retreat Helen Ma & Mark Williams - Sat & Sun 14 - 15 July 2018

Show retreat program

Post-conference retreat 14 & 15 July 2018
Location: University of Amsterdam (conference venue, non-residential), max. 120 participants
“Bringing Practice to Life: The Place of Vedana/Feeling Tone in Mindfulness”
HELEN MA AND MARK WILLIAMS
Helen Ma, PhD, has worked as a clinical psychologist in the health care field for many years. She first taught MBCT in 2001 under the supervision of Dr. John Teasdale, while conducting her doctoral research on MBCT at the University of Cambridge. Since then, she has been teaching MBSR and MBCT, leading meditation retreats, conducting training programs and supervising professionals in mindfulness-based approaches in Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and China. She is the Founding Teacher of the Hong Kong Center for Mindfulness and a visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Hong Kong’s Centre of Buddhist Studies.
Mark Williams, PhD, is emeritus Professor of Clinical Psychology and Founding Director and Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry (UK) where he co-developed MBCT. He was Director of the Oxford Mindfulness Centre until his retirement in 2013. He is (co)-author of several books on mindfulness, including the pioneering work “mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression: a new approach to preventing relapse” (2002, 2012). His more recent book “Mindfulness and the Transformation of Despair: Working with People at Risk of Suicide” (2015) provides clinicians and mindfulness teachers with a comprehensive framework for understanding suicidality and its underlying vulnerabilities.
Preliminary schedule:
Saturday 14th July
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Welcome, registration, coffee and tea
9:00 – 9:15 a.m. Word of welcome, practicalities
9:15 a.m. Practice
10:15 a.m. Morning break (silent)
10:40 a.m. Practice
12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Warm lunch (silent)
1:30 Practice
3:30 p.m. Afternoon break (silent)
4:00 p.m. Practice
5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Supper (silent)
6:30 – 7:10 p.m. Practice
7:10 – 8:15 p.m. Dharma talk, Q&A
8:15 – 9:00 p.m. Practice and closure
Sunday 15th July
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Welcome, registration, coffee and tea
9:00 – 9:15 a.m. Introduction and practicalities
9:15 a.m. Practice
10:30 a.m. Morning break (silent)
11:00 a.m. Practice
12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Warm lunch (silent)
1:30 Practice
2:50 p.m. Break (silent)
3:20 Practice
4:50 Closing Reflection and Practice
5:00 p.m. Retreat ends

Title

Mindful management in larger organizations

Presenter 1

Felicia Huppert – Towards an ideal RCT on the benefits of mindfulness: theory versus reality in a healthcare organisation.

Presenter 2

Arndt Büssing – Situational awareness but not frequency of non-interventional meditation relates to lower stress perception and higher life satisfaction of hospital staff

Presenter 3

Ravindra Ganesh – The Stressed Executive: Sources and Predictors of Stress among Participants in an Executive Health Program

Presenter 4

Elizabeth King – Mindful Boards: A theoretically guided approach to attuning the attention, awareness and acceptance of directors and the Boards they serve.

Chair:

Felicia Huppert

Samuel Wong, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Family Medicine and head of the Division of Family Medicine and Primary Healthcare at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (HK). He works as Associate Director in Undergraduate Education of the School of Public Health and Primary Care since 2009. His research interests include evaluating and developing mindfulness based interventions, such as mindfulness for children and adolescents with ADHD, and developing and evaluating other mental health interventions for a variety of populations in primary care.

“From Cradle to Grave: Taking a life course approach to mindfulness interventions”

Mindfulness-based interventions have been applied in populations of diverse age groups and various populations including pregnant women, pre-school children, school aged children, adolescents, young adults, adult populations (e.g. working men, menopausal women), older adults and people approaching death. In this presentation, review and ongoing research on mindfulness interventions in improving health and well-being, as well as quality of life will be described using the life course perspective. Current and further plans on the evaluation of mindfulness interventions such as MYmind for children and adolescents with both externalizing and internalizing problems would also be presented.

Martine Batchelor studied Zen Buddhism as a Buddhist nun between 1975 and 1985, primarily in South Korea. After returning to Europe in 1985 with her husband Stephen, Martine has been leading retreats, worked as a lecturer and spiritual counselor, and has written several books on, for example, Zen meditation from the female perspective. Her most recent book “Meditation for Life” (2016) is a vividly photographed book that encourages us to bring creative awareness to every aspect of our lives and reveals how every moment can be an opportunity to find joy.

“The Impact of Mindfulness of Feeling Tone (vedana) on Well-Being”

During this talk I would like to explore mindfulness of the feeling tones, which is the second foundation of the practice of mindfulness. First I will try to present the different aspects of mindfulness. Secondly I will try to define feeling tones and thirdly how to be mindful of them. The Pali term vedana refers to the affective tone of experience. When we come into contact through one of our six senses with the environment, we experience a pleasant, unpleasant or neither pleasant nor unpleasant feeling tone. It is important to see that feeling tones are constructed, they are not a given, they do not reside in the object we come in contact with. It is vital to be aware of feeling tones as they arise extremely fast and have a profound impact on our behavior. I would like to propose that developing a caring and careful mindfulness of feeling tones could be one of the keys to well-being.

Mind and Life Europe is well underway with an exciting new initiative establishing a “Community on Contemplative Education” (CCE) which is generating a good deal of support, interest, new knowledge and clarity on what needs to be done. It builds on the considerable work that Mind & Life Institute and its partners have conducted in the field at the intersection of education and contemplative science over the last decades. This lunchtime meeting will share with those present a brief report of our progress so far, invite comments and wider discussion of what direction and actions is most helpful in reaching out and supporting work in this area across Europe, and invite anyone interested to sign up to hear of further progress, or indeed join in the initiative. You will hear of the considerable progress of a wide-reaching investigation, including an on line survey and skype interviews, which has helped us generate support and interest, and uncover and start to map the wealth of interesting and innovative teaching, research and concept development that is taking place across Europe in schools and universities. Responses have helped us to become clearer about current thinking across Europe on appropriate language/terminologies, theories, concepts, barriers and facilitators to developing contemplative and mindfulness based approaches in education. You will hear of our plans to hold a small first meeting of experts in Rotterdam in September to move this along further, and our efforts to generate resources for further meetings and other actions, which aim to build supportive platforms such as local groups and internet databases and networks, and to uncover and disseminate existing work, and create carefully targeted new work – around useful resources, blueprints and manuals, teacher education, pilot projects, case studies and robust evaluated research. We are working in collaborative ways that do not compete with existing work, but join people together, build on strengths and are tuned to the culturally and educationally diverse nature of Europe.

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 Mark Williams, PhD, is emeritus Professor of Clinical Psychology and Founding Director and Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry (UK) where he co-developed MBCT. He was Director of the Oxford Mindfulness Centre until his retirement in 2013. He is (co)-author of several books on mindfulness, including the pioneering work “mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression: a new approach to preventing relapse” (2002, 2012). His more recent book “Mindfulness and the Transformation of Despair: Working with People at Risk of Suicide” (2015) provides clinicians and mindfulness teachers with a comprehensive framework for understanding suicidality and its underlying vulnerabilities.

“Mindfulness: keeping our balance”
In all our search for evidence of efficacy of, and mechanisms underlying mindfulness programmes, it is easy to lose sight of the paradoxes inherent in this work. How can it be that bringing awareness to potentially overwhelming emotional and physical difficulties could ever be helpful? Yet taking such a risk seems to be helpful for many people, and is transformative for some. Mindfulness walks a tightrope: Each aspect of practice has the potential to change our relationship to the thoughts, sensations, feelings and impulses that arise, or can lapse into ever-so-subtle cajoling of ourselves and others.
How can we keep our balance, when so many individuals, groups and even politicians are looking to the field for help with seemingly intractable problems?
On the one side we see challenges: these including over-enthusiasm, the risk of harm, and the danger of either over-loading mindfulness programmes or alternatively, fractionating into rival sub-fields. On the other side, we see encouraging signs: new clinical trials that extend the scope of the evidence; new perspectives both from recent psychological science and historical exploration of Greek practical philosophy; wide acknowledgement of ways in which mindfulness programmes need to build on the ‘stem cell’ of MBSR to meet the distinct needs of people who suffer from a range of emotional and physical problems for which older programs were not designed.
The most encouragement comes from the continuing dialogue within the community of conscientious practitioners, teachers and scientists, and the acknowledgement of the multiple talents that need to coalesce if the field is to move forward.

 Trish Bartleyis extensively involved in training mindfulness-based teachers to understand and support the potential of the group to benefit their participants. She has taught mindfulness to people with cancer since 2001, and developed the MBCT protocol for this group, supported by John Teasdale and Mark Williams. She teaches MBCT in groups and 1to1 to those with advanced illness. Trish is a member of the core training team at CMRP. She offers retreats and mindfulness-based training workshops in the UK, Europe and South Africa. Her latest book “Mindfulness: A Kindly Approach to Being with Cancer” (2016) offers people with cancer a means to bring mindfulness and kindliness into their lives, to help them cope with the challenge of a life-threatening illness.

“Mindfulness and Cancer: A Clinical Lesson”

In this brief presentation, Trish will share some ideas and reflections as to what in her experience are the salient issues facing people with cancer – and what mindfulness can offer. She will draw on the experiences of some of those she has worked with – to headline the key tools and approaches within MBCT for Cancer – a programme she has developed, taught and written about: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer (Bartley, 2012) and Mindfulness: A Kindly Approach for Being with Cancer (Bartley, 2017).
This will include:

 

Ajahn Amarois a Theravada Buddhist monk and teacher, and abbot of the Amaravati Buddhist Monastery in Hemel Hempstead (UK). The centre, in practice as much for ordinary people as for monastics, is inspired by the Thai forest tradition and the teachings of the late Ajahn Chah. Before the spiritual search that led him to Thailand where he was ordained as bhikkhu in 1979, Ajahn Amaro received a BSc. In Psychology and Physiology from the University of London. He authored numerous books addressing various aspects of Buddhism, his latest publication “For The Love of The World” (2014) attempts to address some of the issues arising from the ecological tensions in the world today.

“Unshakable Well-Being – is the Buddhist concept of enlightenment a meaningful possibility in the current age?”

‘What does ‘spiritual enlightenment’ mean, particularly in the context of modern day western society? Are there gradations of such enlightenment?  How could this concept from Buddhist Psychology inform mindfulness teachers, practitioners and researchers? This talk and discussion session will explore the classical Buddhist descriptions of the levels of enlightenment and their relevance in terms of the establishment of a stable and profound psychological well-being, independent of life circumstances. It will explore the levels of mental maturation from the Buddhist perspective and compare them to such western psychological concepts as Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs; particular focus being given to practical means of bringing about such maturation and self-actualisation.

 Willoughby Britton, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and neuroscientist. She is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Assistant Professor of Behavioral and Social Sciences at Brown University (USA) where she directs the Clinical and Affective Neurosciences Lab (CLANlab). Her research focuses on the psychophysiological and neurocognitive effects of cognitive training and mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for mood and anxiety disorders. As a clinician, she has taught MBSR and MBCT to both clinical and non-clinical populations. She has a specific interest in safety of MBIs and meditation practice.


Jared Lindahl, PhD, is Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Brown University (USA) and is director of the humanities research track in the Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab. Since 2010 he has been involved in the Varieties of Contemplative Experience project working closely with Willoughby Britton. His ongoing research integrates historical and textual studies of contemplative traditions with phenomenological and neurobiological approaches.

“Meditation Safety: Research and Practice”

The workshop is consist of two parts: research and practice.
Part 1: Meditation Safety: Research Overview
Part 1 reviews the findings from the recent Varieties of Contemplative Experience project, the most comprehensive study to date on meditation-related challenges. Part 1 will also review adverse effects data from mindfulness-based interventions. The training includes detailed descriptions of meditation-related challenges, including subject quotes, how often they occur, how long they last, and potential risk factors.

Part 2: Meditation Safety in Practice
Part 2 focuses more on concrete steps to ensure safety for your program, and includes four modules: informed consent, screening, monitoring, and management. This training is accompanied by access to the Meditation Safety Toolbox, which includes official curricula and implementation guidelines, informed consent, screening instruments from the UMASS, Oxford and Bangor Centers for Mindfulness, as well as a folder of research and other resources.

Informed Consent:This module reviews the informed consent process, including advertising brochures, and other statement of benefits vs limitations and risks.

Screening: The screening module provides training in how to screen participants who are interested in taking an MBI program, and includes review of inclusion/exclusion criteria and decision trees for participation, and screening instruments.

Monitoring: The monitoring module teaches facilitators how to adequately monitor or track potential adverse reactions in their mindfulness clients, beyond “passive monitoring”. This module focuses on the meditation-related difficulties that are most likely to occur with MBI interventions, such as anxiety/panic, traumatic re-experiencing and dissociation.

Management: The management module teaches facilitators how to manage difficulties once they arise, as well as modify their instructions to minimize the likelihood of adverse reactions. This module draws heavily from trauma-informed therapies. Specific exercises and practices are provided, as well as other resources for further training.

Learning Objectives:

Learn person-centered and culturally-informed methods of management and minimization of risk.

Title

If you treasure it, measure it: assessing mindfulness, compassion, and equanimity

Presenter 1

Ruth Baer – Assessment of mindfulness: Current status and future directions

Presenter 2

Clara Strauss – Assessment of compassion for self and others: Conceptualization and development of new measures

Presenter 3

Philippe Goldin– A Multidimensional Approach to Compassion Measurement – Scale Development and Application

Presenter 4

Amit Bernstein – Assessment of equanimity: Conceptual model and an experience sampling study

Chair:

Ruth Baer

Title

Experimental studies investigating the possible working mechanisms of mindfulness

Presenter 1

Nikolett Eisenbeck – Efficacy of the different components of the focused breathing mindfulness exercise in cognitive performance. An experimental analysis.

Presenter 2

Zaffie Cox – Do different forms of short-intervention meditation effect state-mindfulness differently?

Presenter 3

Inka Papenfuss – Responding to uncertain threat as a potential mediator of an inverse relation between mindfulness and anxiety

Presenter 4

Katleen Van der Gucht – An Experience Sampling Study Examining the Potential Impact of a Mindfulness-Based Intervention on Emotion Differentiation

Chair:

Johannes Michalak

Title

Diversity in the mindfulness community?

Presenter 1

Nava Levit-Binnun – A Mindfulness-Based Framework for Social Change

Presenter 2

Inge de Leeuw – A Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: An exploratory study with mixed-methods evaluation

Presenter 3

Amanda Fu – Nonattachment as a protective resource for well-being in sexual minorities

Presenter 4

Tiara Cash – Student-Athlete Post-Athletic Assimilation Stress (PAAST): Making a Case for Mindfulness

Chair:

Nava Levit-Binnun

Title

Critical and Social Perspectives on Mindfulness

Presenter 1

Rachel Lilley– Mindfulness as social and environmental change – developing a new transition science to move mindfulness from the therapeutic to the political

Presenter 2

David Forbes– The Need for Social Mindfulness in US Public Schools

Presenter 3

Nicholas Canby – Assessing the role of social factors in Mindfulness-Based Interventions

Presenter 4

Kristina Eichel – Exclusion by Omission: A Systematic Review of Diversity Variables in Mindfulness Based Interventions

Chair:

Kristina Eichel

Title

Adults with ADHD and parents of children with ADHD

Presenter 1

Lotte Janssen – Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) versus treatment as usual (TAU) in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Presenter 2

Philip Asherson – Mind Wandering in Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a new perspective on ADHD, and a target for mindfulness training

Presenter 3

Dirk Geurts – The effects of mindfulness based cognitive therapy on behavioural control in patients with ADHD

Presenter 4

Herman Lo – The effects of family partner mindful yoga on ADHD symptomology in young children and their parents: A pilot randomized control trial

Chair:

Philip Asherson

Title

Self-compassion interventions: qualitative and quantitative impact

Presenter 1

Angelica Lopez – A Critical Examination of the Relationship between Self-compassion and Depressive Symptoms

Presenter 2

Terri Messman-Moore – The Role of Fear of Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Facets in Psychological Outcomes Related to Child Maltreatment in University Women

Presenter 3

Marion Spijkerman – Compassion-focused therapy as guided self-help for enhancing public mental health: A randomised controlled trial

Presenter 4

Rhoda Schuling – Branches of compassion: affective processes in participants’ experiences with Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living

Chair:

Maya Schroevers

Title

Breaking the cycle of desire: The role of mindfulness in craving for alcohol, drugs, and food

Presenter 1

Brian Ostafin – Getting unhooked: Mindfulness decouples the relation between an implicit measure of alcohol motivation and downstream alcohol-related behaviors

Presenter 2

Brian Ostafin – Surfing the urge: Mindfulness moderates the relation between hazardous cannabis use and implicit and explicit measures of cannabis attitudes

Presenter 3

Esther Aarts – The effect of mindful eating training on anticipatory reward responses in the midbrain

Presenter 4

Mike Keesman – The decentering component of mindfulness plays a key role in reducing cravings

Chair:

Brian Ostafin

Title

Trajectories and dynamic changes during and after mindfulness interventions

Presenter 1

Evelien Snippe – The course of change in stress, negative affect, and stress-sensitivity during  mindfulness-based stress reduction

Presenter 2

Ivan Nyklíček – Daily mood during Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction: the role of momentary awareness and (ruminative) thinking

Presenter 3

Christopher May – Examining dynamic changes in individual and dyadic responses to a segmented mindfulness intervention

Presenter 4

Nina Vollbehr – Temporal dynamics of daily life stress, affect, and several cognitive variables before and after a mindful yoga intervention

Chair:

Ruth Baer

Title

Mindfulness in the justice system

Presenter 1

Machteld Hoeve – Effects of mindfulness training in police officers

Presenter 2

Nelleke van Zessen – Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Inmates in Dutch prisons: Results of a mixed methods pilot study

Presenter 3

Nienke Bouw – Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Inmates in Dutch prisons

Presenter 4

Christina Spinelli – Mindfulness and yoga training as adjunctive therapies in forensic patient treatment

Chair:

Machteld Hoeve

Title

Mindfulness in the workplace: scientific evidence and open questions

Presenter 1

Silke Rupprecht – Mindfulness in the workplace: What do we really know and how can we advance the field?

Presenter 2

Esther de Bruin – Mindful2Work the next steps: Addition of a wait-list control measurement and qualitative interviews

Presenter 3

Wendy Kersemaekers – A Workplace Mindfulness Intervention May Be Associated with Improved Psychological Well-Being and Productivity. A Preliminary Field Study in a Company Setting.

Presenter 4

Linda Kantor– On productivity, power and multiple perspectives: what do participants say about mindfulness training for organizations?

Chair:

Wibo Koole

Title

Mindfulness for chronic somatic conditions

Presenter 1

Gillian Mathews – The lived experience of mindfulness training in people with chronic conditions: a community-based, longitudinal phenomenological study

Presenter 2

Erica Sibinga – Mindfulness-based stress reduction improves coping in urban HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States

Presenter 3

Barbara Pickut – Mindfulness for People with Parkinson’s: Emotional Well Being, Social Support and Group Effect

Presenter 4

Lotte Berk – TANDEM: mindfulness training for people with early-stage dementia and their caregivers: a mixed-methods study

Chair:

Barbara Pickut

Title

Online mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for cancer patients

Presenter 1

Linda Cillessen – Long-term effects, predictors, moderators and mechanisms of group face-to-face and individual internet-based Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy for distressed cancer patients.

Presenter 2

Marije van der Lee – Effectiveness of web-based MBCT for Chronic Cancer-Related Fatigue compared to an active control condition: results of the ‘Fitter na kanker’ 3-armed Randomized Controlled Trial

Presenter 3

Félix Compen – Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer Patients Delivered via Internet: Qualitative Study of Patient and Therapist experiences

Presenter 4

Julia Wahl – Development of a Compassion for Cancer curriculum for cancer patients in stages I-III and cancer survivors.  Origins, rationale and initial observations.

Chair:

Marije van der Lee

Coming soon

Ruth Baer, PhD, is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Kentucky in Lexington (USA) where she teaches and supervises several mindfulness-based interventions including acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR). She is one of the leading authors in the field of mindfulness, researching its conceptualization, effectiveness, working mechanisms and relation to other psychological variables. Her book “Practising Happiness: How Mindfulness Can Free You From Psychological Traps and Help You Build the Life You Want” (2014) is the first self-help book to integrate the wisdom, skills and practices available from the four leading evidence-based mindfulness treatments (MBSR, MBCT, DBT and ACT).

“Ethical Issues in Mindfulness-Based Programs”
In Buddhist traditions, where many mindfulness practices have their roots, mindfulness training is accompanied by explicit instruction in ethical conduct. In contemporary mindfulness-based programs (MBPs), explicit ethical instruction is largely absent, for a variety of cultural, professional, and legal reasons. These differing approaches to mindfulness training have led to extensive discussion of ethical issues in the contemporary mindfulness field. This keynote will provide an overview of questions of current interest. These include:

 

Rebecca Crane, PhD, is director of the Centre for Mindfulness Research & Practice at Bangor University (UK), and has been a leading role in its development since it was founded in 2001. She has a background as occupational therapist and integrative counselor. Her research focuses on the delivery of evidence-based mindfulness-based interventions in different settings, with a particular focus on the integrity of the teaching and therapist competency. She teaches and trains internationally in both MBSR and MBCT. She is the author of “Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy” (2008, 2017) which provides a concise, straightforward overview of MBCT and is essential reading for professionals and trainees in the field.


 Bethan Robertshas a background in Health Economics and Women’s Studies, with a focus on Equality and Diversity. She is an experienced Mental Health First Aid instructor and has worked for many years in the field of mental health. She has been a mindfulness teacher and trainer for the CRMP at Bangor University since 2010, teaching mindfulness programs (MBSR) to workplaces, community groups and general public groups as well as a one-to-one basis with individuals with mental health issues. Her research focuses on mindfulness and social inequalities.

“Widening the circle of concern: resourcing ourselves to meet the challenge and opportunity of diversity and inclusion”
Social justice is one of the defining issues of the time we live in. Despite enormous progress across the world in addressing poverty, there remain deep divides in terms of who gets access to education, health and social opportunities. These themes are prevalent in the context of mindfulness teaching also.  The practice of mindfulness brings the issues of common humanity to the fore in a particular way. As we engage with the practice we come into deeper connection with personal and collective suffering; we become more willing to allow a greater breadth and depth of the reality of the human situation to touch and affect us; we recognise both the universality of human distress, and the particular societal patterns that perpetuate distress for certain groups; and we build a more honest way of compassionately relating to these experiences. Compassion has two phases – a phase of feeling and connecting with the suffering of self or other, and a phase of actively engaging and responding skilfully. Both are important – by opening to other peoples experience of exclusion, discrimination and stigma so we can feel the importance of why we should act. The first phase requires us to extend our circle of concern to people to whom we might habitually not give attention; and to look deeply into our own conditioning and inherited privileges. The second phase empowers us to take compassionate action now – this might include a spectrum of actions from subtle shifts in how we orientate to our participants, to building in systemic structural changes which enable greater take up from underrepresented groups.
There is increasing awareness and action being taken in the mindfulness field in connection with issues of accessibility. We will give space to reflecting on how we can continue to engage with this theme in the midst of the fullness of the day to day demands that our mindfulness work presents. This workshop aims to be a part of a wider process of resourcing ourselves to connect more deeply with social justice, and to reflect on practical actions that each of us can take within our own research and teaching contexts.

Learning outcomes:

  1. To orientate awareness to the theme of accessibility, thus resourcing participants in working skilfully with it
  2. To reflect on how the practices of mindfulness and compassion can be a key way that we resource ourselves to deepen into personal connection with collective human suffering
  3. To share ideas and commit to some practical actions which can be implemented in participants teaching/research context

 

Title

Using sound to heal: from metaphysics to application

Presenter 1

Nicholas Schwalbe – From Nada Brahma to Nada Yoga : the Yoga of Sound, or how to transform a metaphysics of sound into a way of life.

Practice session

Presenter 2

Gabrielle Bodzin – Using sound to heal: the neuroscience of sound perception, mysticism, and healing.

Presenter 3

Nils de Mol van Otterloo – Music, mindfulness, and Compassion: Neuroscience of sound as healing intervention

Chair:

Murali Nair

Title

Philosophical and anthropological perspectives on the mindfulness movement

Presenter 1

Graeme Nixon – Contemporary critiques of the emergence of mindfulness within Euro-American culture

Presenter 2

Jane Kellock Arnold – Living a mindful life: an hermeneutic phenomenological inquiry into the lived experience of secular mindfulness, compassion and insight

Presenter 3

Ngar-Sze Lau – Exploration of inter-religious meditation experience: Mindfulness practice of Christians in Hong Kong

Presenter 4

Josef Mattes – On the psychology of mindfulness dogmatism

Chair:

Graeme Nixon

Title

Social psychological insights into mindfulness

Presenter 1

Geoffrey Haddock – What does it mean to be mindful?

Presenter 2

Kim Lien van der Schans – Mindful social inferences: the influence of a decentering instruction on hostile attributions of ambiguous social situations in a lab study

Presenter 3

Colin Foad – Investigating relationships between mindfulness and socio-political constructs.

Presenter 4

Lynsey Mahmood – Same job, different name: Mindfulness attenuates attributional errors of outgroup job seekers

Chair:

Tim Hopthrow

Title

Using mindfulness-based interventions in addictive behaviours

Presenter 1

Oscar Lecuona – Mindfulness-based relapse prevention for alcohol and cocaine abusers as complementary treatment: An individualized approach

Presenter 2

Kimberly Carrière – Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Presenter 3

Nadine Richter – Mindfulness and Sustainable Food Consumption

Presenter 4

Konstantinos Zervos – “project EATT: eating mindfully, redefining the relationship with food and my body”

Chair:

Judson Brewer

Title

Tapering of antidepressant medication – trials and tribulations

Presenter 1

Anders Sørensen – Cochrane Review of psychopharmacological withdrawal

Presenter 2

Alice Tickell – Experiences of tapering antidepressants in the context of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Findings from the PREVENT trial.

Presenter 3

Carolien Wentink – An Exploration of the Facilitators and Barriers of Discontinuation of Antidepressant Medication after Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in Patients with Recurrent Depression.

Presenter 4

Claudi Bockting – Preventive cognitive therapy compared to medication for relapse prevention in depression

Chair:

Zindel Segal

Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, is founding Executive Director of the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (USA). He is also the founding director of its renowned Stress Reduction Clinic and emeritus Professor of Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Kabat-Zinn received his Ph.D. in molecular biology from MIT in 1971. He has been teaching mindfulness and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) worldwide for decades and has written numerous articles and bestselling books on mindfulness and its application. These include his groundbreaking “Full Catastrophe Living: How to Cope with Stress, Pain and Illness Using Mindfulness Meditation” (1990, 1996, 2013) and “Wherever You Go, There You Are” (1994, 2004). His research interests include mind-body interactions and clinical applications of mindfulness and its effects on the brain, the immune system, emotional expression, and healing in various somatic conditions, as well as the application of MBSR for prison inmates and staff; in multicultural settings; and on stress in various corporate settings and work environments. His new book “Falling Awake: How to Practice Mindfulness in Everyday Life” is due in August 2018.

“The Stress of Success: Opportunities and Challenges in the Mindfulness Universe, 2018”

The explosion of interest in mindfulness world-wise carries both endless opportunites and also major challenges for clinicians, scientists, educators, and others. In this talk and conversation, Jon will explore the challenges of living the practice and embodying openhearted wakefulness in our lives at this moment on the planet. He will emphasize the universal dharma roots of mindfulness and what they call for in terms of our own individual cultivation of mindfulness as a practice and as a way of being, and how it interfaces with our work in the world as professionals—in other words, what our responsibilities are—if its healing and transformative dimensions are not to be lost or hopelessly diluted as mindfulness moves more and more into the mainstream of society.

Ronald Epstein, MD, PhD, is Professor of Family Medicine, Psychiatry and Oncology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry (USA), where he also directs the Center for Communication and Disparities Research. He co-directs Mindful Practice programs and the Deans Teaching Fellowship program. Through his work and development of innovative educational programs, he has been passionately devoted to promoting physician self-awareness, mindfulness and effective communication in clinical practice. His latest book “Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity” (2017) is a crucial, timely book that shows us how we can restore humanity to medicine, guides us toward a better overall quality of care, and reminds us of what matters most.

“Attending: Mindful Practice at Work”
In this keynote, I will outline how mindfulness can be cultivated in work settings to help people flourish in their professional lives and act as a healing influence on those with whom they interact – colleagues, patients, clients, partners.

Judson Brewer, MD, PhD, is a psychiatrist and internationally known expert in the field of mindfulness for addiction. He is Director of Research at the Center for Mindfulness and Associate Professor in Medicine and Psychiatry at UMass Medical School (USA). He has developed and tested novel mindfulness programs for habit change, including in-person and app-based treatments. Other research interests include the underlying neural mechanisms of mindfulness meditation. In “The Craving Mind: From Cigarettes to Smartphones to Love – Why We Get Hooked and How We Can Break Bad Habits” (2017) he describes the mechanisms of habit and addiction formation, then explains how the practice of mindfulness can interrupt these habits.

“The craving mind: why we get hooked, and how mindfulness helps us break free from addictive habits”
We are all vulnerable to craving. Whether it’s a compulsion to constantly check social media, binge eat, smoke, excessively drink, or any other behavior, we may find ourselves uncontrollably repeating. Why are bad habits so hard to overcome? Can we learn how our minds work, and even tap into this very process to find a key to conquer the cravings we know are unhealthy for us and open our natural capacities for awareness and kindness? In this talk, using examples from my lab’s clinical studies of in-person and app-based mindfulness training as well as data from neuroimaging paradigms, I will describe why habits and addictions are formed, and how awareness helps us tap into these very behavioral and brain mechanisms that encourage habitual behaviors in order to step out of them.

Martine Batchelorstudied Zen Buddhism as a Buddhist nun between 1975 and 1985, primarily in South Korea. After returning to Europe in 1985 with her husband Stephen, Martine has been leading retreats, worked as a lecturer and spiritual counselor, and has written several books on, for example, Zen meditation from the female perspective. Her most recent book “Meditation for Life” (2016) is a vividly photographed book that encourages us to bring creative awareness to every aspect of our lives and reveals how every moment can be an opportunity to find joy.

“The Impact of Mindfulness of Feeling Tone (vedana) on Well-Being”
The Pali term vedana refers to the affective tone of experience. During this workshop I would like to explore mindfulness of the feeling tones, which is the second foundation of the practice of mindfulness. When we come into contact through one of our six senses with the environment, we experience a pleasant, unpleasant or neither pleasant nor unpleasant feeling tone. It is important to see that feeling tones are constructed, they are not a given, they do not reside in the object we come in contact with. It is vital to be aware of feeling tones as they arise extremely fast and have a profound impact on our behavior. I would like to propose that developing a caring and careful mindfulness of feeling tones could be one of the keys to well-being.
The workshop will deal with the practical aspects of vedana, and will consist of a presentation and Q&A session, followed by different forms of practice and small group sessions focusing on listening and seeing practice.
In this workshop you will learn:

Title

Mindfulness, art and performance

Presenter 1

Julie Artman – If the Buddha walked mindfully on stage: actor empowerment and character embodiment.

Presenter 2

Heather Kempton – A brief survey of the spiritual aesthetic of poetry in secular mindfulness training.

Presenter 3

Anne-Marie Czajkowski – The effects of Mindfulness for Singers: An 8-week intervention replication study for University and Conservatoire vocalists

Presenter 4

Jian-Hong Chen – Mindfulness training enhance flow state and mental health among baseball players in Taiwan

Chair:

Julie Artman

Title

Assessing mindfulness and discernment

Presenter 1

Josef Mattes– Systematic review and meta-analysis of correlates of FFMQ mindfulness facets

Presenter 2

Oscar Lecuona – A psychometric review and replication study of the Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) latent structure.

Presenter 3

Sarah Chan– Secular mindfulness and discerning mindfulness: Discernment Scale validation and experimental study on their differential effects

Presenter 4

Harald Walach – Towards an objective behavioral assessment system of mindfulness

Chair:

Harald Walach

Title

Exploring the brain and behavioral  mechanisms of MBIs for depression and anxiety

Presenter 1

Clara Lopez-Sola – Brain and mind changes after an online Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) intervention in women at high risk of depressive relapse

Presenter 2

Le-anh Dinh-Williams – Changes in Reward Processing Following Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and Lasting Wellness

Presenter 3

Norman Farb– Mindfulness Training, Stress-Evoked Viscerosomatic Suppression, and Depression Vulnerability

Presenter 4

Philippe Goldin – Investigating brain and behavioral indices of emotion regulation and mindfulness skills during an RCT of CBT versus MBSR for social anxiety disorder

Chair:

Philippe Goldin

Title

Common Suffering – Addressing the Hearts, Minds, and Bodies of Health Professionals.

Presenter 1

 Lucy Sternburgh – Mindfulness within the Framework of an Employee Wellness Program: Supporting the Wellbeing of Health Care Professionals and their Family Members

Presenter 2

Ruth Lerman – Physician, Let Thy Patients Heal Thee: MBSR for a Mixed Class of Physicians, Patients and Family Members

Presenter 3

Dawn MacDonald – C.A.R.ing for our most important resource: Compassion, Attention, and Resiliency in Health and Human Service Organizations

Presenter 4

Cara Geary– Teaching the art of being a Healing Presence to medical students: A 6-month integrated curriculum focusing on mindfulness.

Chair:

Cara Geary

Title

Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Children and Adolescents with ADHD

Presenter 1

Renée Meppelink – Mindfulness versus Medication in Childhood ADHD: An RCT.

Presenter 2

Herman Lo – The effects of family-based mindfulness intervention on ADHD symptomology in young children and their parents

Presenter 3

Anna Huguet – Deficient Emotional Self-Regulation (DESR) in ADHD children: Mindfulness as a first line effective treatment modality

Presenter 4

Corina Greven – The design of a study on mindfulness for children with ADHD and parallel mindful parenting versus care-as-usual: The MindChamp project

Chair:

Nirbhay Singh

Title

Are Mindfulness-Based Self-Help Resources Helpful?

Presenter 1

Heather Taylor – A little bit of mindfulness does you good: Findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis of unguided mindfulness-based self-help interventions

Presenter 2

Clara Strauss – Findings from a pilot randomised controlled trial of guided self-help MBCT for depression in an NHS talking therapies service

Presenter 3

Jenny Gu – Investigating the Specific Effects of an Online Mindfulness-Based Self-Help Intervention on Stress and Underlying Mechanisms

Presenter 4

Moitree Banerjee – Barriers to Mindfulness: The Role of Rumination and Worry in Predicting Psychological and Physical Engagement in an Online Mindfulness-Based Intervention

Chair:

Clara Strauss

Title

Mindfulness and cognitive processes in major depressive disorder

Presenter 1

Frances Shawyer – In a large pragmatic trial of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), neuroticism mediated the relationship between mindfulness and depression

Presenter 2

Christine Kuehner – Rumination and mindful attention in depressed patients

Presenter 3

Pawel Holas– Modification of negative attentional and interpretative biases following MBCT in major depression, an eye-tracking study.

Presenter 4

Eva Henje Blom– Mindfulness-based treatment of adolescent depression, preliminary results from a MRI connectomics proof of concept study.

Chair:

Willem Kuyken

Title

Letting in the light: The role of mindfulness in eliciting positive emotion

Presenter 1

Brian Ostafin – The doors of perception: Mindfulness and the experience of awe

Presenter 2

Nicole Geschwind – Upward spiral dynamics: From mindfulness to positive emotions … and back

Presenter 3

Hester Trompetter – Self-compassion: A psychological resource to buffer stress and aid emotional resilience in daily life?

Presenter 4

Barney Dunn – How Does Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy Bolster Positive Affect and How is This Related To the Prevention of Depressive Relapse?

Presenter 5

Dirk Geurts – The effects of mindfulness based cognitive therapy on behavioural control in patients with ADHD

Chair:

Brian Ostafin

Title

Mindfulness and Leadership Research

Presenter 1

Silke Rupprecht – Mindful leadership: The leaders’ narrative how mindfulness affects their leadership style and performance

Presenter 2

Kiki Vreeling – Conceptualizing Mindful leadership: a qualitative study among medical specialists.

Presenter 3

Megan Reitz – How does mindfulness training develop the critical leadership capacities of resilience, collaboration and complexity leadership – and is practice feasible?

Presenter 4

Elizabeth King– The Wheel of Mindfulness: A Generative Framework for Mindful Leadership DevelopmentThe Wheel of Mindfulness: A Generative Framework for Mindful Leadership Development.

Chair:

Wendy Kersemaekers

Title

Mindfulness-Based Programs for Families with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Presenter 1

Mette Elmose – MYmind-DK. Investigating the feasibility and effect of MYmind in a Danish context.

Presenter 2

Dexing Zhang – MYmind for Chinese adolescents with ASD and their parents: a pilot study

Presenter 3

Anna Ridderinkhof– MYmind for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of Children and Parents

Presenter 4

Oleg Medvedev – Component Analysis of Stepped Care Mindfulness-based Positive Behavior Support with Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Randomized Controlled Trial

Chair:

Esther de Bruin

Title

Cost-effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Interventions

Presenter 1

Janneke Grutters – An introduction to cost-effectiveness

Presenter 2

Lotte Janssen– Cost-effectiveness of  MBCT added to treatment as usual for adults with ADHD

Presenter 3

Félix Compen– Cost-effectiveness of MBCT or online MBCT versus treatment as usual in women with breast cancer

Presenter 4

Gert Jan van der Wilt – Discontinuation of antidepressant medication after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for recurrent depression: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Chair:

Janneke Grutters

Stephen Batchelor is a writer, translator, teacher and artist. Born in 1953, he was ordained as a Buddhist monk at the age of twenty and spent ten years training in the Tibetan Geluk and Korean Sŏn orders. Since 1986, he has taught at Gaia House meditation centre in Devon, England.
In 2015 he co-founded Bodhi College, a European educational project dedicated to the understanding and application of early Buddhism. His most recent publications are “After Buddhism, Rethinking the Dharma for a Secular Age” (2016) and “Secular Buddhism, Imagining the Dharma in an Uncertain World” (2017). He travels worldwide to lecture and lead retreats and lives in south-west France with his wife Martine.

“Secular Dharma: From Truths to Tasks”
Rather than basing itself on the classical Buddhist doctrine of the four noble truths, the approach of Secular Dharma is based on a radical re-reading of these truths as a set of interconnected tasks to be recognized, performed and mastered. This is summed up in the acronym ELSA: Embrace life, Let go of reactivity, See the stopping of reactivity, and Actualise a path. In providing a philosophical and ethical framework for the practice of mindfulness, ELSA moves us away from Buddhism as a set of religious beliefs and allows us to reconsider the dharma as the foundation for a secular culture of awakening.

Katherine Weare, PhD, is Emeritus Professor at the Universities of Exeter and Southampton in the UK. Trained as a teacher of mindfulness at the University of Exeter, she now works in their postgraduate diploma course training mindfulness teachers. She regularly teaches MBCT/MBSR courses, and follow ups, to a wide range of groups, attends regular silent insight meditation retreats to support her daily practice and has just completed the Committed Practitioner Programme with Bodhi College.
She is known internationally for her work on mental health, well-being, social and emotional learning and mindfulness in education, and has published widely in the field, reviewing the evidence base on ‘what works’, advising policy makers and governments, and developing practical strategies across most European countries.
She advises various mindfulness projects such as the UK Mindfulness in Schools Project, the Plum Village mindfulness community and the UK government on policy surrounding mindfulness and wellbeing, and has written several books on the topic. Her recent book, co-written a book with Thich Nhat Hanh ‘Happy Teachers Change The World’ (2017) is helping to cultivate a more holistic and less instrumental approach to mindfulness in educational contexts, and is currently being translated into a wide range of languages.
Katherine is a board member for Mind and Life Europe and is working with them on a new project to develop networks, support and pilot projects on contemplative education across Europe.

Judson Brewer, MD, PhD, is a psychiatrist and internationally known expert in the field of mindfulness for addiction. He is Director of Research at the Center for Mindfulness and Associate Professor in Medicine and Psychiatry at UMass Medical School (USA). He has developed and tested novel mindfulness programs for habit change, including in-person and app-based treatments. Other research interests include the underlying neural mechanisms of mindfulness meditation. In “The Craving Mind: From Cigarettes to Smartphones to Love – Why We Get Hooked and How We Can Break Bad Habits” (2017) he describes the mechanisms of habit and addiction formation, then explains how the practice of mindfulness can interrupt these habits.

“Mind the gap”. Beyond the 8 week course: a reflection and dialogue about possible follow-up formats to support MBI participants in maintaining and deepening their practice
The ‘8 week course’ in various forms has become the standard introduction to mindfulness in many places, and protocol and research base for it fairly well established. It is much less clear where participants go after that to develop mindfulness, there is something of a theory and practice ‘gap’ between this basic course and more intensive approaches, and a dearth of research into various approaches. This interactive workshop will draw out the experience of the facilitators and the group participants around bridging this gap.

Participants will:

 
We will reflect together on how the strengths and limitations of the ‘8 week’ starting point and what we can hope to achieve in that time. We will together explore the experience in the room of a range of follow on opportunities, and some of the issues that arise from them. To start us off the presenters will share their experiences:

 

Jud will reflect on the graduate classes that have been offered at the Center for Mindfulness at UMass Medical School over the past 40 years, and 2) The development of the “MBSR-2” graduate program, and 3) the development of “flipped classroom” graduate and feeder classes for mindful eating and anxiety that combine app-based training + weekly in-person group facilitation.

 

Katherine will reflect on various approaches taking place in the UK in a health, educational and community based settings, including reunions, drop ins, follow up courses and secular retreats, and attempting to build mindful cultures in institutions to cultivate mindful practices, attitudes and policies.

 

We will then pool further experiences in the room of follow ups, and the issues they raise.

 

Title

Integrating Self-Compassion and Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT)  for Children and Teens

Presenter 1

David Dewulf – Mindfulness and self-compassion for teens and kids.

Presenter 2

Sacha Rombouts – The Action Heroes: A Resource for Teaching Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) to Children.

Chair:

David Dewulf

Title

From contemplative science to contemplative society

Presenter 1

Mareike Smolka – The meditating brain in context: when an embedded humanist elicits ethical reflections on neuroscientific meditation research

Presenter 2

Vincenzo Giorgino – Opening a Contemplative Commons During the Great Transition : Reorienting the MBIs (part 1)

Presenter 3

Donald McCown – Opening a Contemplative Commons During the Great Transition : Reorienting the MBIs (part 2)

Timeslot 4

Reflection / panel discussion

Chair:

Nirbhay Singh

Title

Uncovering the neurocognitive mechanisms of meditation using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)

Presenter 1

Gunes Sevinc – Learning Not to Fear: Mindfulness Improves Retention of Fear Extinction – A randomized controlled fMRI investigation

Presenter 2

Anne Maj van der Velden – Neural mechanisms of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in the treatment of recurrent major depressive disorder: study protocol

Presenter 3

Thorsten Barnhofer – Reversing latent vulnerabilities: effects of a brief intensive mindfulness training in patients with persistent depression

Presenter 4

Gunes Sevinc – Common and Dissociable Mechanisms of Stress Reduction following the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Relaxation Response Programs

Chair:

Dirk Geurts

Title

Mindfulness and Other Mind-Body Interventions in Health Professions Education

Presenter 1

Aviad Haramati – Impact of a course in mind-body medicine on mindfulness, perceived stress and empathy in medical students.

Presenter 2

Sian Cotton – Mindfulness in Medical Student Education and Beyond: Outcomes and Lessons Learned from a University-Wide Expansion of a Mind-Body Program

Presenter 3

Raphaël Bonvin – “I don’t have time; I just have to pass my exams… “

Presenter 4

Andrea Grabovac – Standardizing Training in Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Canadian Psychiatry Postgraduate Programs: A Competency-Based Framework

Chair:

Aviad Haramati

Title

Online mindfulness approaches to promote well-being in the community

Presenter 1

Amanda Li – Effectiveness of 21-day mindfulness-based intervention on healthy diet through WhatsApp: A randomized controlled trial

Presenter 2

Winnie Mak – TourHeart—Online mindfulness-based training as prevention of anxiety and depression: A randomized controlled trial

Presenter 3

Kathleen Walsh – Effects of a Mindfulness-Meditation App on Subjective Well-Being: An Active Control, Experience Sampling Study

Presenter 4

Eduard de Bruin – The contribution of mindfulness-based relaxation exercises to Internet-delivered CBT for insomnia in adolescents: Results from a randomized controlled trial.

Presenter 5

Karen Dobkins – Changes in Well-Being from a 30-Minute Meditation:
Comparing the Effects of Different Delivery Methods

Chair:

Karen Dobkins

Title

Implementation of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy

Presenter 1

Kristen Rawlett – Precursor to a Tailored Mindfulness Intervention with Adolescents: Engaging the Community

Presenter 2

Marleen ter Avest – The role of adherence in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for recurrent depression

Presenter 3

Graham Meadows – Scaling up delivery of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy – an application of agent-based simulation modelling to inform strategic health services planning.

Chair:

Graham Meadows

More information to be announced soon

Willem Kuyken, PhD, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Oxford (UK) where he is director of the Oxford Mindfulness Centre. From 1999 to 2014 he worked at the University of Exeter, where he held a number of roles including leading the clinical research group and conducting two randomized controlled trials of MBCT for depression. His ongoing research focuses on depression and evidence based approaches to depression, in particular how MBCT can prevent depression and enhance human potential across the lifespan.

“Mindfulness: the confluence of ancient wisdom and modern psychological science”
“Most people believe the mind to be a mirror, more or less accurately reflecting the world outside of them, not realizing on the contrary, that the mind itself is the principal element of creation.”
– Rabindrath Tagore –

Your decision to come to this session, the ideas I will explore, much of what causes suffering in the world, the steps we can take to end suffering – they all originate in the human mind and heart. In this moment the human mind and heart holds the potential for understanding, transformation and liberation. We can create and recreate our lives. We can shape the world around us. This is the extraordinary power we have.
This session will explore the confluence of Buddhist psychology and psychological science. We will explore the ways they come together to provide a map of the mind and route maps for mindfulness teachers and students to follow in mindfulness-based programmes. There will be a presentation, practice and time for discussion.

Heleen Slagter, PhD, is a cognitive neuroscientist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology of the University of Amsterdam (NL), and Principal investigator of the Cognition and Plasticity Laboratory. Her current research interests include (the neural basis of) core cognitive capacities such as attention, and methods that may enhance these capacities, including mindfulness mediation.

“Contemplative Neuroscience: Findings, Challenges, and Future Directions”
Neuroscience research within the last few decades has shown that the brain is much more plastic, or able to change in structure and function, than was once thought possible. This has spurred interest in meditation as a method to improve brain and mental functioning. In my talk, I will explore recent neuroscientific research on how different types of meditation may influence how we pay attention and perceive the world around us. In doing so, I will also consider how meditation effects may be understood within the scientific framework of predictive processing. This framework has rapidly gained scientific traction in recent years and shows notable parallels to Buddhist theories in that it proposes that the brain continuously constructs its own reality and that everyday experience is conditioned by top-down expectations derived from past experiences. I will also briefly consider challenges that the field of Contemplative Neuroscience in particular faces, and end by delineating important avenues of further inquiry.

Zindel Segal, PhD, is Distinguished Professor of Psychology in Mood Disorders at the University of Toronto (CA) and a Senior Scientist in the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He is one of the founders of MBCT and a substantial part of his research focuses on mindfulness-based intervention programs in psychiatry and mental health. His groundbreaking book “Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression, A New Approach to Preventing Relapse” (2002) has been updated in a second edition (2012) and continues to be the blueprint for MBCT worldwide.

“A Benevolent Frankenstein Enters the Therapeutic Mainstream”
Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy is a Frankenstein of sorts – constructed from seemingly disparate elements – such as training in mindfulness meditation and the cognitive theory of affective disorder. And yet, it has amassed a broad appeal and proven effectiveness. Perhaps its hybrid nature provides an advantage in the prevention field, where the aim is less on reducing symptoms than in fostering wellness. This is, however speculative, since the question of how exactly this multi-modal treatment achieves its benefits remains largely unanswered. It is still fair to ask, for example, about the relative contribution of cognitive therapy principles versus mindfulness practice to the gains patients report. Clarifying mechanisms of action is of more than academic interest, as it will likely inform the approach taken to training the next generation of MBCT practitioners. In addition, a focus on mechanisms can only enhance efforts to address the largest obstacle faced by patients interested in this form of care, namely limited access. I will address the questions of mechanisms of action and the contribution of mindfulness practice to prevention outcomes by drawing on analyses of neural, self-report and practice data from a recently completed 2 year longitudinal trial of MBCT and CBT in remitted depressed individuals. Implications for the clinical practice of MBCT from these data will also be featured.

Alison Evans was trained as an occupational therapist and later specialized as an MBCT therapist and trainer. From 2008 to 2017 she has worked at the mood disorders centre at the university of Exeter as a lead therapist in clinical trials of MBCT for depression. She is also co-director of the Mindfulness Network CIC. Alison has a particular interest in Mindfulness-Based Supervision (MBS). She worked closely with Cindy Cooper and Jody Mardula in developing understandings about the nature of MBS and articulating a framework and model for its delivery. Recently, she joined the CMRP team to develop and deliver training in MBS.
“What makes mindfulness-based supervision mindful?
Mindfulness-based supervision (MBS) is an important part of training and ongoing professional development for teachers of mindfulness-based interventions (MBI). There are ways that it draws upon longstanding models of supervision in other settings, and ways that it is distinctive. The articulation of what it is and how to supervise is at an early stage.
In this workshop frameworks and understandings will be offered, alongside case study examples and opportunities for interactive dialogue. The workshop will be aimed at those who teach MBIs or supervise MBI teachers.

Key learning objectives are:

Title

Interconnectedness—The key to personal and collective well-being

Presenter 1

Winnie Mak – Promotion of well-being by raising the awareness on the interdependent nature of all matter: Construction and validation of the Interconnectedness Scale

Presenter 2

Ben Yu – Transcending the self: How interconnectedness is linked to nature connectedness and well-being

Presenter 3

Amanda Fu – From personal well-being to social justice for all: How interconnectedness bridges individuals to the collective

Presenter 4

Ben Yu – Reducing stigma through interconnectedness and compassion: A Buddhism-based approach for stigma reduction on people with mental illness

Chair:

Winnie Mak

Title

Advanced meditators: experimental and experiential perspectives

Presenter 1

Antonino Raffone – The effects of focused attention, open monitoring and loving kindness meditation on pain experience and its electroencephalographic correlates in Theravada Buddhist monks

Presenter 2

Leigh Riby – Behavioural and electrophysiological markers of attentional control and emotional regulation in expert meditators.

Presenter 3

Qi Wang – Advanced Meditators’ Lived Experience of Enlightenment Moment: A Phenomenological Study of The Mechanisms of Suffering Transcendence

Presenter 4

James Walsh – Mindfulness practice, dispositional mindfulness and the processing of aversive stimuli

Chair:

Antonino Raffone

Title

Mindfulness-Based Interventions: What Works Best, For Whom, and Why?

Presenter 1

Anne Maj van der Velden – A systematic review of mechanisms of change in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in the treatment of recurrent major depressive disorder.

Presenter 2

Ivan Nyklíček– Psychological effects of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction: The moderating and mediating roles of psychological interest and insight.

Presenter 3

Jeffrey Greeson – Mindfulomics: Searching for the Molecular “Signature” of Mindfulness

Presenter 4

Shian-Ling Keng – Effects of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction on Psychological Symptoms and Telomere Length: A Randomized Active-Controlled Trial

Chair:

Jeffrey Greeson

Title

Mindful management in larger organizations

Presenter 1

Felicia Huppert – Towards an ideal RCT on the benefits of mindfulness: theory versus reality in a healthcare organisation.

Presenter 2

Arndt Büssing – Situational awareness but not frequency of non-interventional meditation relates to lower stress perception and higher life satisfaction of hospital staff

Presenter 3

Ravindra Ganesh – The Stressed Executive: Sources and Predictors of Stress among Participants in an Executive Health Program

Presenter 4

Elizabeth King – Mindful Boards: A theoretically guided approach to attuning the attention, awareness and acceptance of directors and the Boards they serve.

Chair:

Felicia Huppert

Title

Mindfulness-based parenting interventions for mothers of infants and toddlers.

Presenter 1

Eva Potharst – Mindful with your Toddler: Feasibility and Effects of a Mindful Parenting Group Training for Mothers and their Toddlers

Presenter 2

Myrthe Boekhorst – Mindful with your Toddler: An Online Mindful Parenting Training for Mothers with Toddlers

Presenter 3

Cristina Colonnesi – Improving parental sensitivity and mind-mindedness with a Mindful Parenting group training for mothers and their infants/toddlers

Chair:

Eva Potharst

Title

Mindfulness for patients with inflammatory and stress-related somatic disorders

Presenter 1

Adrián Pérez-Aranda – MBSR versus the multicomponent intervention FibroQoL in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled trial

Presenter 2

Rebecca Yeates – Self-compassion, coping and psychological distress in young people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Presenter 3

Julia Henrich – Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Presenter 4

Christina Surawy – MBCT for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Disussion of the structure and intentions of a new 6-week programme

Chair:

Christina Surawy

Title

Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: A Transdiagnostic Approach

Presenter 1

Bruno Cayoun – Understanding and Integrating Mindfulness with CBT through the Co-emergence Model of Reinforcement. A Rationale for Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Presenter 2

Alice Shires – A comparison of the efficacy of mindfulness-based interoceptive exposure and distraction in the management of chronic pain.

Presenter 3

Sarah Francis – Effectiveness of Mindfulness-integrated cognitive behaviour therapy for reducing symptoms of common mental health conditions: a randomized controlled trial; preliminary findings.

Presenter 4

Andrea Grabovac – Therapeutic rationale for teaching explicit ethics in Mindfulness- integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Chair:

Lynette Monteiro

Title

Mechanisms and practices of mindfulness in the workplace

Presenter 1

Chris Tamdjidi – Examining the effect sizes of different formats of mindfulness intervention in the workplace

Presenter 2

Ute Hulsheger – Mindfulness, Autonomous Self-regulation and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Organizational Intervention Study

Presenter 3

Esther de Bruin – The Unilever Study: Positive Effects on Personal Goals, Well-Being, and Functioning at Work after the Mindfulness in a Frantic World Training

Presenter 4

Hiske van Ravesteijn – The influence of MBSR on the professional development of medical doctors: a qualitative study

Chair:

Michael Chaskalson

Title

Integrating First-Person and Third-Person Perspectives in Contemplative Science

Presenter 1

Judson Brewer – Neurobiological Underpinnings of Contemplative Practices: Is there Common Ground?

Presenter 2

Yuval Hadash – A Novel Phenomenological and Behavioral Measure of Attention and Awareness in Mindfulness Meditation: The Mindful Awareness Task (MAT)

Presenter 3

Amit Bernstein – Measuring Internal Attention to Thoughts: Conceptual Model and Paradigm

Presenter 4

Fynn-Mathis Trautwein – Differential Benefits of Mental Training Types for Attention, Compassion, and Theory of Mind

Chair:

Amit Bernstein

Title

Mechanisms and practices of mindfulness in the workplace

Presenter 1

Chris Tamdjidi – Examining the effect sizes of different formats of mindfulness intervention in the workplace

Presenter 2

Ute Hulsheger – Mindfulness, Autonomous Self-regulation and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Organizational Intervention Study

Presenter 3

Esther de Bruin – The Unilever Study: Positive Effects on Personal Goals, Well-Being, and Functioning at Work after the Mindfulness in a Frantic World Training

Presenter 4

Hiske van Ravesteijn – The influence of MBSR on the professional development of medical doctors: a qualitative study

Chair:

Michael Chaskalson

Title

Cross-cultural benefits of Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP)

Presenter 1

Larissa Duncan – Longitudinal RCT investigation of mechanisms of Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting’s benefits for postpartum mental health up to 2 years post-birth

Presenter 2

Samuel Wong – Promoting Mental Well-being of Pregnant Women with Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP): A Randomized Controlled Trial in Hong Kong

Presenter 3

Irena Veringa-Skiba – Effects of Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP) in pregnant women with high levels of fear of childbirth and their partners.

Presenter 4

Kishani Townshend – Mechanisms And Mediators Of Mindful Parenting

Chair:

Larissa Duncan

Title

Mindfulness for cancer patients

Presenter 1

Maja Johannsen – Mindfulness and late-treatment pain in women treated for breast cancer: A step toward implementation

Presenter 2

Else Bisseling – Therapeutic alliance, not therapist competence, predicts outcome of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for distressed cancer patients

Presenter 3

Melanie Schellekens – The role of mindfulness in grieving over a loved one who died from lung cancer: A qualitative study.

Presenter 4

Soumaya Ahmadoun – Impact of a mindfulness-based intervention on chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction and brain alterations: A pilot study.

Chair:

Melanie Schellekens

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