Presenters & Workshop Leaders

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS


PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP LEADERS


OTHER SPEAKERS AND IN-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP LEADERS

Stephen Batchelor is a writer, translator, teacher and artist. Born in 1953, he was ordained as a Buddhist monk at the age of twenty and spent ten years training in the Tibetan Geluk and Korean Sŏn orders. Since 1986, he has taught at Gaia House meditation centre in Devon, England.
In 2015 he co-founded Bodhi College, a European educational project dedicated to the understanding and application of early Buddhism. His most recent publications are “After Buddhism, Rethinking the Dharma for a Secular Age” (2016) and “Secular Buddhism, Imagining the Dharma in an Uncertain World” (2017). He travels worldwide to lecture and lead retreats and lives in south-west France with his wife Martine.

“Secular Dharma: From Truths to Tasks”
Rather than basing itself on the classical Buddhist doctrine of the four noble truths, the approach of Secular Dharma is based on a radical re-reading of these truths as a set of interconnected tasks to be recognized, performed and mastered. This is summed up in the acronym ELSA: Embrace life, Let go of reactivity, See the stopping of reactivity, and Actualise a path. In providing a philosophical and ethical framework for the practice of mindfulness, ELSA moves us away from Buddhism as a set of religious beliefs and allows us to reconsider the dharma as the foundation for a secular culture of awakening.

Katherine Weare, PhD, is Emeritus Professor at the Universities of Exeter and Southampton in the UK. Trained as a teacher of mindfulness at the University of Exeter, she now works in their postgraduate diploma course training mindfulness teachers. She regularly teaches MBCT/MBSR courses, and follow ups, to a wide range of groups, attends regular silent insight meditation retreats to support her daily practice and has just completed the Committed Practitioner Programme with Bodhi College.
She is known internationally for her work on mental health, well-being, social and emotional learning and mindfulness in education, and has published widely in the field, reviewing the evidence base on ‘what works’, advising policy makers and governments, and developing practical strategies across most European countries.
She advises various mindfulness projects such as the UK Mindfulness in Schools Project, the Plum Village mindfulness community and the UK government on policy surrounding mindfulness and wellbeing, and has written several books on the topic. Her recent book, co-written a book with Thich Nhat Hanh ‘Happy Teachers Change The World’ (2017) is helping to cultivate a more holistic and less instrumental approach to mindfulness in educational contexts, and is currently being translated into a wide range of languages.
Katherine is a board member for Mind and Life Europe and is working with them on a new project to develop networks, support and pilot projects on contemplative education across Europe.

Judson Brewer, MD, PhD, is a psychiatrist and internationally known expert in the field of mindfulness for addiction. He is Director of Research at the Center for Mindfulness and Associate Professor in Medicine and Psychiatry at UMass Medical School (USA). He has developed and tested novel mindfulness programs for habit change, including in-person and app-based treatments. Other research interests include the underlying neural mechanisms of mindfulness meditation. In “The Craving Mind: From Cigarettes to Smartphones to Love – Why We Get Hooked and How We Can Break Bad Habits” (2017) he describes the mechanisms of habit and addiction formation, then explains how the practice of mindfulness can interrupt these habits.

“Mind the gap”. Beyond the 8 week course: a reflection and dialogue about possible follow-up formats to support MBI participants in maintaining and deepening their practice
The ‘8 week course’ in various forms has become the standard introduction to mindfulness in many places, and protocol and research base for it fairly well established. It is much less clear where participants go after that to develop mindfulness, there is something of a theory and practice ‘gap’ between this basic course and more intensive approaches, and a dearth of research into various approaches. This interactive workshop will draw out the experience of the facilitators and the group participants around bridging this gap. We will reflect together on how the strengths and limitations of the ‘8 week’ starting point and what we can hope to achieve in that time. We will together explore the experience in the room of a range of follow on opportunities, and some of the issues that arise from them. To start us off the presenters will share their experiences:

 

Jud will reflect on the graduate classes that have been offered at the Center for Mindfulness at UMass Medical School over the past 40 years, and 2) The development of the “MBSR-2” graduate program, and 3) the development of “flipped classroom” graduate and feeder classes for mindful eating and anxiety that combine app-based training + weekly in-person group facilitation.

 

Katherine will reflect on various approaches taking place in the UK in a health, educational and community based settings, including reunions, drop ins, follow up courses and secular retreats, and attempting to build mindful cultures in institutions to cultivate mindful practices, attitudes and policies.

 

We will then pool further experiences in the room of follow ups, and the issues they raise.

 

Participants will:

 

Title

Integrating Self-Compassion and Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT)  for Children and Teens

Presenter 1

David Dewulf – Mindfulness and self-compassion for teens and kids.

Presenter 2

Sacha Rombouts – The Action Heroes: A Resource for Teaching Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) to Children.

Chair:

David Dewulf

Title

From contemplative science to contemplative society

Presenter 1

Wolfgang Lukas – Contemplative Collaboration – a CERN-inspired Vision for the Future of Contemplative Science based on Cooperation, Competition, Community, and Contemplative Practice

Presenter 2

Mareike Smolka – The meditating brain in context: when an embedded humanist elicits ethical reflections on neuroscientific meditation research

Presenter 3

Vincenzo Giorgino & Donald McCown – Opening a Contemplative Commons During the Great Transition : Reorienting the MBIs

Timeslot 4

Reflection / panel discussion

Chair:

Nirbhay Singh

Title

Uncovering the neurocognitive mechanisms of meditation using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)

Presenter 1

Gunes Sevinc – Learning Not to Fear: Mindfulness Improves Retention of Fear Extinction – A randomized controlled fMRI investigation

Presenter 2

Anne Maj van der Velden – Neural mechanisms of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in the treatment of recurrent major depressive disorder: study protocol and preliminary findings

Presenter 3

Thorsten Barnhofer – Reversing latent vulnerabilities: effects of a brief intensive mindfulness training in patients with persistent depression

Presenter 4

Gunes Sevinc – Common and Dissociable Mechanisms of Stress Reduction following the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Relaxation Response Programs

Chair:

Dirk Geurts

Title

Mindfulness and Other Mind-Body Interventions in Health Professions Education

Presenter 1

Aviad Haramati – Impact of a course in mind-body medicine on mindfulness, perceived stress and empathy in medical students.

Presenter 2

Sian Cotton – Mindfulness in Medical Student Education and Beyond: Outcomes and Lessons Learned from a University-Wide Expansion of a Mind-Body Program

Presenter 3

Raphaël Bonvin – “I don’t have time; I just have to pass my exams… “

Presenter 4

Andrea Grabovac – Standardizing Training in Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Canadian Psychiatry Postgraduate Programs: A Competency-Based Framework

Chair:

Aviad Haramati

Title

Online mindfulness approaches to promote well-being in the community

Presenter 1

Amanda Li – Effectiveness of 21-day mindfulness-based intervention on healthy diet through WhatsApp: A randomized controlled trial

Presenter 2

Winnie Mak – TourHeart—Online mindfulness-based training as prevention of anxiety and depression: A randomized controlled trial

Presenter 3

Kathleen Walsh – Effects of a Mindfulness-Meditation App on Subjective Well-Being: An Active Control, Experience Sampling Study

Presenter 4

Eduard de Bruin – The contribution of mindfulness-based relaxation exercises to Internet-delivered CBT for insomnia in adolescents: Results from a randomized controlled trial.

Presenter 5

Karen Dobkins – Changes in Well-Being from a 30-Minute Meditation:
Comparing the Effects of Different Delivery Methods

Chair:

Karen Dobkins

Title

Implementation of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy

Presenter 1

Kristen Rawlett – Precursor to a Tailored Mindfulness Intervention with Adolescents: Engaging the Community

Presenter 2

Marleen ter Avest – The role of adherence in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for recurrent depression

Presenter 3

Kira Steinhaus – (How) do therapists use mindfulness in their clinical work? A study on the implementation of mindfulness interventions

Presenter 4

Graham Meadows – Scaling up delivery of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy – an application of agent-based simulation modelling to inform strategic health services planning.

Chair:

Graham Meadows

More information to be announced soon

Willem Kuyken, PhD, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Oxford (UK) where he is director of the Oxford Mindfulness Centre. From 1999 to 2014 he worked at the University of Exeter, where he held a number of roles including leading the clinical research group and conducting two randomized controlled trials of MBCT for depression. His ongoing research focuses on depression and evidence based approaches to depression, in particular how MBCT can prevent depression and enhance human potential across the lifespan.

“Mindfulness: the confluence of ancient wisdom and modern psychological science”
“Most people believe the mind to be a mirror, more or less accurately reflecting the world outside of them, not realizing on the contrary, that the mind itself is the principal element of creation.”
– Rabindrath Tagore –

Your decision to come to this session, the ideas I will explore, much of what causes suffering in the world, the steps we can take to end suffering – they all originate in the human mind and heart. In this moment the human mind and heart holds the potential for understanding, transformation and liberation. We can create and recreate our lives. We can shape the world around us. This is the extraordinary power we have.
This session will explore the confluence of Buddhist psychology and psychological science. We will explore the ways they come together to provide a map of the mind and route maps for mindfulness teachers and students to follow in mindfulness-based programmes. There will be a presentation, practice and time for discussion.

Heleen Slagter, PhD, is a cognitive neuroscientist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology of the University of Amsterdam (NL), and Principal investigator of the Cognition and Plasticity Laboratory. Her current research interests include (the neural basis of) core cognitive capacities such as attention, and methods that may enhance these capacities, including mindfulness mediation.

“Contemplative Neuroscience: Findings, Challenges, and Future Directions”
Neuroscience research within the last few decades has shown that the brain is much more plastic, or able to change in structure and function, than was once thought possible. This has spurred interest in meditation as a method to improve brain and mental functioning. In my talk, I will explore recent neuroscientific research on how different types of meditation may influence how we pay attention and perceive the world around us. In doing so, I will also consider how meditation effects may be understood within the scientific framework of predictive processing. This framework has rapidly gained scientific traction in recent years and shows notable parallels to Buddhist theories in that it proposes that the brain continuously constructs its own reality and that everyday experience is conditioned by top-down expectations derived from past experiences. I will also briefly consider challenges that the field of Contemplative Neuroscience in particular faces, and end by delineating important avenues of further inquiry.

Zindel Segal, PhD, is Distinguished Professor of Psychology in Mood Disorders at the University of Toronto (CA) and a Senior Scientist in the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He is one of the founders of MBCT and a substantial part of his research focuses on mindfulness-based intervention programs in psychiatry and mental health. His groundbreaking book “Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression, A New Approach to Preventing Relapse” (2002) has been updated in a second edition (2012) and continues to be the blueprint for MBCT worldwide.

“A Benevolent Frankenstein Enters the Therapeutic Mainstream”
Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy is a Frankenstein of sorts – constructed from seemingly disparate elements – such as training in mindfulness meditation and the cognitive theory of affective disorder. And yet, it has amassed a broad appeal and proven effectiveness. Perhaps its hybrid nature provides an advantage in the prevention field, where the aim is less on reducing symptoms than in fostering wellness. This is, however speculative, since the question of how exactly this multi-modal treatment achieves its benefits remains largely unanswered. It is still fair to ask, for example, about the relative contribution of cognitive therapy principles versus mindfulness practice to the gains patients report. Clarifying mechanisms of action is of more than academic interest, as it will likely inform the approach taken to training the next generation of MBCT practitioners. In addition, a focus on mechanisms can only enhance efforts to address the largest obstacle faced by patients interested in this form of care, namely limited access. I will address the questions of mechanisms of action and the contribution of mindfulness practice to prevention outcomes by drawing on analyses of neural, self-report and practice data from a recently completed 2 year longitudinal trial of MBCT and CBT in remitted depressed individuals. Implications for the clinical practice of MBCT from these data will also be featured.

Alison Evans was trained as an occupational therapist and later specialized as an MBCT therapist and trainer. From 2008 to 2017 she has worked at the mood disorders centre at the university of Exeter as a lead therapist in clinical trials of MBCT for depression. She is also co-director of the Mindfulness Network CIC. Alison has a particular interest in Mindfulness-Based Supervision (MBS). She worked closely with Cindy Cooper and Jody Mardula in developing understandings about the nature of MBS and articulating a framework and model for its delivery. Recently, she joined the CMRP team to develop and deliver training in MBS.
“What makes mindfulness-based supervision mindful?
Mindfulness-based supervision (MBS) is an important part of training and ongoing professional development for teachers of mindfulness-based interventions (MBI). There are ways that it draws upon longstanding models of supervision in other settings, and ways that it is distinctive. The articulation of what it is and how to supervise is at an early stage.
In this workshop frameworks and understandings will be offered, alongside case study examples and opportunities for interactive dialogue. The workshop will be aimed at those who teach MBIs or supervise MBI teachers.

Key learning objectives are:

Title

Interconnectedness—The key to personal and collective well-being

Presenter 1

Winnie Mak – Promotion of well-being by raising the awareness on the interdependent nature of all matter: Construction and validation of the Interconnectedness Scale

Presenter 2

Ben Yu – Transcending the self: How interconnectedness is linked to nature connectedness and well-being

Presenter 3

Amanda Fu – From personal well-being to social justice for all: How interconnectedness bridges individuals to the collective

Presenter 4

Ben Yu – Reducing stigma through interconnectedness and compassion: A Buddhism-based approach for stigma reduction on people with mental illness

Chair:

Winnie Mak

Title

Advanced meditators: experimental and experiential perspectives

Presenter 1

Antonino Raffone – The effects of focused attention, open monitoring and loving kindness meditation on pain experience and its electroencephalographic correlates in Theravada Buddhist monks

Presenter 2

Leigh Riby – Behavioural and electrophysiological markers of attentional control and emotional regulation in expert meditators.

Presenter 3

Qi Wang – Advanced Meditators’ Lived Experience of Enlightenment Moment: A Phenomenological Study of The Mechanisms of Suffering Transcendence

Presenter 4

James Walsh – Mindfulness practice, dispositional mindfulness and the processing of aversive stimuli

Chair:

Antonino Raffone

Title

Mindfulness-Based Interventions: What Works Best, For Whom, and Why?

Presenter 1

Anne Maj van der Velden – A systematic review of mechanisms of change in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in the treatment of recurrent major depressive disorder.

Presenter 2

Ivan Nyklíček– Psychological effects of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction: The moderating and mediating roles of psychological interest and insight.

Presenter 3

Jeffrey Greeson – Mindfulomics: Searching for the Molecular “Signature” of Mindfulness

Presenter 4

Shian-Ling Keng – Effects of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction on Psychological Symptoms and Telomere Length: A Randomized Active-Controlled Trial

Chair:

Jeffrey Greeson

Title

Mindfulness in the Education System

Presenter 1

Marie Ottilie Frenkel – Does Mindfulness Benefit Fifth-Graders´ Psychological Being?

Presenter 2

Tammy Gilligan – Student Outcomes, Teacher Feedback, and Best Practices for Implementation of Mindfulness Interventions in K-12 Settings

Presenter 3

Nils Altner – Taking Mindfulness to Town – How mindful teachers change the school system

Presenter 4

Jesus Montero-Marin – Teachers ‘Finding Peace in a Frantic World’: the mediating role of mindfulness and self-compassion to reduce Type-A behaviours and burnout

Chair:

Harald Walach

Title

Mindfulness-based parenting interventions for mothers of infants and toddlers.

Presenter 1

Eva Potharst – Mindful with your Toddler: Feasibility and Effects of a Mindful Parenting Group Training for Mothers and their Toddlers

Presenter 2

Diane Abatemarco – Mindfulness with women and their children in drug  treatment

Presenter 3

Myrthe Boekhorst – Mindful with your Toddler: An Online Mindful Parenting Training for Mothers with Toddlers

Presenter 4

Cristina Colonnesi – Improving parental sensitivity and mind-mindedness with a Mindful Parenting group training for mothers and their infants/toddlers

Chair:

Eva Potharst

Title

Mindfulness for patients with inflammatory and stress-related somatic disorders

Presenter 1

Adrián Pérez-Aranda – MBSR versus the multicomponent intervention FibroQoL in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled trial

Presenter 2

Rebecca Yeates – Self-compassion, coping and psychological distress in young people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Presenter 3

Julia Henrich – Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Presenter 4

Christina Surawy – MBCT for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Disussion of the structure and intentions of a new 6-week programme

Chair:

Christina Surawy

Title

Establishing a contemplation & mindfulness center in the educational system in Israel

Presenter 1

Yossi Ben Asher – Establishing a contemplation & mindfulness center in the educational system in Israel

Chair:

Yossi Ben Asher

Title

Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: A Transdiagnostic Approach

Presenter 1

Bruno Cayoun – Understanding and Integrating Mindfulness with CBT through the Co-emergence Model of Reinforcement. A Rationale for Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Presenter 2

Alice Shires – A comparison of the efficacy of mindfulness-based interoceptive exposure and distraction in the management of chronic pain.

Presenter 3

Sarah Francis – Effectiveness of Mindfulness-integrated cognitive behaviour therapy for reducing symptoms of common mental health conditions: a randomized controlled trial; preliminary findings.

Presenter 4

Andrea Grabovac – Therapeutic rationale for teaching explicit ethics in Mindfulness- integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Chair:

Lynette Monteiro

Title

Mechanisms and practices of mindfulness in the workplace

Presenter 1

Chris Tamdjidi – Examining the effect sizes of different formats of mindfulness intervention in the workplace

Presenter 2

Ute Hulsheger – Mindfulness, Autonomous Self-regulation and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Organizational Intervention Study

Presenter 3

Esther de Bruin – The Unilever Study: Positive Effects on Personal Goals, Well-Being, and Functioning at Work after the Mindfulness in a Frantic World Training

Presenter 4

Hiske van Ravesteijn – The influence of MBSR on the professional development of medical doctors: a qualitative study

Chair:

Michael Chaskalson

Title

Integrating First-Person and Third-Person Perspectives in Contemplative Science

Presenter 1

Judson Brewer – Neurobiological Underpinnings of Contemplative Practices: Is there Common Ground?

Presenter 2

Yuval Hadash – A Novel Phenomenological and Behavioral Measure of Attention and Awareness in Mindfulness Meditation: The Mindful Awareness Task (MAT)

Presenter 3

Amit Bernstein – Measuring Internal Attention to Thoughts: Conceptual Model and Paradigm

Presenter 4

Fynn-Mathis Trautwein – Differential Benefits of Mental Training Types for Attention, Compassion, and Theory of Mind

Chair:

Amit Bernstein

Title

Mechanisms and practices of mindfulness in the workplace

Presenter 1

Chris Tamdjidi – Examining the effect sizes of different formats of mindfulness intervention in the workplace

Presenter 2

Ute Hulsheger – Mindfulness, Autonomous Self-regulation and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Organizational Intervention Study

Presenter 3

Esther de Bruin – The Unilever Study: Positive Effects on Personal Goals, Well-Being, and Functioning at Work after the Mindfulness in a Frantic World Training

Presenter 4

Hiske van Ravesteijn – The influence of MBSR on the professional development of medical doctors: a qualitative study

Chair:

Michael Chaskalson

Title

Cross-cultural benefits of Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP)

Presenter 1

Larissa Duncan – Longitudinal RCT investigation of mechanisms of Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting’s benefits for postpartum mental health up to 2 years post-birth

Presenter 2

Samuel Wong – Promoting Mental Well-being of Pregnant Women with Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP): A Randomized Controlled Trial in Hong Kong

Presenter 3

Irena Veringa-Skiba – Effects of Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting (MBCP) in pregnant women with high levels of fear of childbirth and their partners.

Presenter 4

Kishani Townshend – Mechanisms And Mediators Of Mindful Parenting

Chair:

Larissa Duncan

Title

Mindfulness for cancer patients

Presenter 1

Maja Johannsen – Mindfulness and late-treatment pain in women treated for breast cancer: A step toward implementation

Presenter 2

Else Bisseling – Therapeutic alliance, not therapist competence, predicts outcome of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for distressed cancer patients

Presenter 3

Melanie Schellekens – The role of mindfulness in grieving over a loved one who died from lung cancer: A qualitative study.

Presenter 4

Soumaya Ahmadoun – Impact of a mindfulness-based intervention on chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction and brain alterations: A pilot study.

Chair:

Melanie Schellekens

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